Wall Street is getting creative with how it schmoozes clients

Welcome back, everyone.  Second-quarter earnings are still trickling in. Four companies in particular jump out. On Tuesday, Walmart and Home Depot report. The following day their respective rivals Target and Lowes check in. If you’re not yet a subscriber, you can sign up here to get your daily dose of the stories dominating banking, business, and…

Wall Street is getting creative with how it schmoozes clients

Welcome back, everyone. 

Second-quarter earnings are still trickling in. Four companies in particular jump out. On Tuesday, Walmart and Home Depot report. The following day their respective rivals Target and Lowes check in. If you’re not yet a subscriber, you can sign up here to get your daily dose of the stories dominating banking, business, and big deals.Like the newsletter? Hate the newsletter? Feel free to drop me a line at ddefrancesco@businessinsider.com or on Twitter @DanDeFrancesco. Wall Street’s new ways to woo clients

Paramount

The return of dining in New York has been a welcome change. And while outdoor seating does add a certain European flair to things, there are some downsides.

It’s tough to enjoy a nice steak while it’s absolutely sweltering outside. And then there’s the issue of ambiance. I have a hard time focusing on my artisanal burger when cars are screaming past my table. Here’s a fantastic story from three of my colleagues on how Wall Street has adapted entertaining clients. Rebecca Ungarino, Meghan Morris, and Bradley Saacks have all the details on ways dealmakers, lawyers, and vendors are looking to schmooze clients. The trio have all the details on the creative ways Wall Street is looking to stay on clients good side. Click here to read the fully story.Investment manager TI
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