Trending: Big Tech companies are getting older but they can still learn new tricks

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Trending, the newsletter where we highlight BI Prime’s biggest tech stories. I’m Alexei Oreskovic, Business Insider’s West Coast bureau chief and global tech editor. If this is your first time here, this is how you can get Trending in your inbox every week.This week: Big Tech companies may be…

Trending: Big Tech companies are getting older but they can still learn new tricks

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Trending, the newsletter where we highlight BI Prime’s biggest tech stories. I’m Alexei Oreskovic, Business Insider’s West Coast bureau chief and global tech editor.

If this is your first time here, this is how you can get Trending in your inbox every week.This week: Big Tech companies may be getting old, but they can still learn new tricks

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

REUTERS/Baz Ratner

It’s a been an eventful week in the world of Big Tech. Microsoft surprised employees on Wednesday with the news of a broad corporate reorganization. According to an internal memo obtained by Ashley Stewart, Microsoft is merging its Windows group and its hardware group into one unified business unit.The big winner: Panos Panay, the chief product officer, who will now oversee this Apple-like effort to more closely intertwine hardware and software.The takeaway: The change is more a reflection of the challenges Windows faces to find a niche in a stagnating PC market than it is a sign of Microsoft’s ambitions to take its hardware business much further than it already has. Microsoft still has to keep the PC makers happy who license its Windows software, so any hardware ambitions that could compete with those partners will always be constrained. And besides, under CEO Satya Nadella, the cloud is number one. Everything else is details.

Meanwhile, Google dropped a couple of bombshells on Monday when it (finally) divulged revenue figures for its Cloud business and for YouTube. The latter, a mere 14 years after Google acquired the video streaming site. The new transparency comes just as Sundar Pichai took over as CEO of the Alphabet parent company. When it comes to financial gift horses though, it’s always worth taking a look at what’s really in the mouth. In this case, Google’s core advertising business is looking — sorry — long in the tooth, as the business ages and growth slows. It’s a challenge facing both Google and Facebook, as the days
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