The leading industry group for truck drivers has declared we’re hurtling toward a trucking ‘bloodbath’

Truckers typically bristle at the American Trucking Associations, an industry group that represents trucking companies rather than America’s 1.8 million truck drivers themselves. They’ve differed on just about every topic in the trucking world — whether teenagers should become truck drivers, if there’s really a trucker shortage, and how truckers should be compensated for rest…

The leading industry group for truck drivers has declared we’re hurtling toward a trucking ‘bloodbath’

Truckers typically bristle at the American Trucking Associations, an industry group that represents trucking companies rather than America’s 1.8 million truck drivers themselves. They’ve differed on just about every topic in the trucking world — whether teenagers should become truck drivers, if there’s really a trucker shortage, and how truckers should be compensated for rest breaks, if at all. But it seems the ATA and truck drivers have reached some sort of agreement on the state of their industry in 2019: It’s suffering. “There is no way these folks are making money now,” the ATA’s chief economist, Bob Costello, said at an industry conference on Monday, as reported by the Commercial Carrier Journal. “We do not have to go into a recession for this to be a bloodbath.” Costello said that because of the decline in rates in the spot market, the next 18 months specifically would be challenging for truckers. The ATA did not respond to Business Insider’s request for further comment. This year alone, nearly 3,000 truck drivers have lost their jobs as trucking companies large and small have shuttered. Major carriers like J.B. Hunt, Knight-Swift, and Schneider have been forced to cut their annual outlooks. The rate sentiment among industry leaders dipped to recession-level lows in July, a Morgan Stanley survey found. Read more: Truckers can’t pay off their fuel cards — and it’s a ‘sure sign’ that more trucking bankruptcies are coming Some positive indicators h
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