Startups Weekly: Remote-first SaaS products boom as workers stay home

Silicon Valley companies had already been going remote-first when the coronavirus became a global pandemic. This means there are lots of great software tools already on the market, that are seeing a huge amount of new usage now. And not just Zoom. Alex Wilhelm checked in with HiveIO, Friday, FreeConferenceCall, Brandlive, Kentik, Bluescape, LogMeIn, and other remote-oriented SaaS startups large and…

Startups Weekly: Remote-first SaaS products boom as workers stay home

Silicon Valley companies had already been going remote-first when the coronavirus became a global pandemic. This means there are lots of great software tools already on the market, that are seeing a huge amount of new usage now. And not just Zoom. Alex Wilhelm checked in with HiveIO, Friday, FreeConferenceCall, Brandlive, Kentik, Bluescape, LogMeIn, and other remote-oriented SaaS startups large and small to get the freshest data for Extra Crunch. Here’s what FreeConferenceCall reported back, for example:
United States and United Kingdom: +6%
India: around +10%
France and South Korea: +20%
Italy: +170%
China: +524%
Hong Kong: +1576%
Vietnam: +3836%
Next, check out Ron Miller’s look at what experts recommend right now (EC) if you’re trying to make the transition for your team or company.
We’ll have more analysis of great remote-first companies and investment areas coming up soon, as the working world goes through this abrupt transition to an already inevitable future. In the meantime, be sure to check out our existing coverage:
How to work during a pandemic (TC)
How we scaled Seeq by being remote first (EC)
How to make remote work work (EC)
Essential tools for today’s digital nomad (EC)
Remote workers and nomads represent the next tech hub (EC)
One final note: wondering why there’s no vaccine yet? Connie Loizos caught up with long-time healthcare investor Camille Samuels for TechCrunch. “The reason you hear about cancer and orphan diseases so much is that you can price high in those areas,” the Venrock partner explains. “In therapeutic areas where you can’t price high because there are already a bunch of generics on the market — pain, depression, other huge unmet needs — you don’t see as much innovation. It’s a matter of [businesses] following the incentives. With infectious disease, you’ve got this problem that maybe someone even a year ago predicted might become a problem, but when it’s a potential and not an actual problem, it’s hard to get investors to fund something like that.”

Three cofounders is the magic team number for pre-seed investors
What are the main characteristics of successful pre-seed fundings these days? Docsend, the document management company that thousands of founders use to share decks with investors, has a new report out that surveys recent pre-seed fundings to determine what success is looking like these days. Resident former VC Danny Crichton dug into the data — based on an anonymized survey of founder-users — and highlighted some surprising trends on TechCrunch. Here’s one: companies with larger founding teams were able to raise with fewer meetings, but the companies that averaged the largest raises per number of mee
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