Principals Assail N.Y.C. Mayor, Calling for State Takeover of Schools

New York|Principals Assail N.Y.C. Mayor, Calling for State Takeover of SchoolsThe union representing New York City’s principals said it had lost confidence in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to reopen schools.After in-person classes were delayed twice, hundreds of thousands of students are set to report back to classrooms this week.Credit…James Estrin/The New York TimesSept. 27,…

Principals Assail N.Y.C. Mayor, Calling for State Takeover of Schools

New York|Principals Assail N.Y.C. Mayor, Calling for State Takeover of SchoolsThe union representing New York City’s principals said it had lost confidence in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to reopen schools.After in-person classes were delayed twice, hundreds of thousands of students are set to report back to classrooms this week.Credit…James Estrin/The New York TimesSept. 27, 2020Updated 4:24 p.m. ETThe union representing New York City’s principals said on Sunday that it had lost confidence in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to reopen schools and called on the state to seize control of the school system from the mayor — a drastic move that raised new obstacles to the city’s fraught reopening effort.The mayor has twice delayed the start of in-person classes, and the vast majority of the city’s 1.1 million students have already started the school year remotely. Hundreds of thousands of students are set to report back to classrooms this week, with elementary schoolchildren expected to start in-person classes on Tuesday, followed by middle and high school students on Thursday.But Mark Cannizzaro, the president of the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, said the city still does not have enough teachers to staff its schools, and that last-minute deals hammered out between the teachers’ union and the city had further undermined principals’ trust in the mayor and their confidence in the reopening plan.Still, Mr. Cannizzaro said that principals would report to buildings as scheduled this week and were not considering a strike. “I think parents should be confident that any child that arrives at a building will be given the utmost care,” Mr. Cannizzaro said.Thousands of principals “must now look staff, parents and children in the eye and say that they have done all they can to provide a safe and quality educational experience, but given the limited resources provided them, this is becoming increasingly difficult,” he said. The union’s executive board cast a unanimous vote of no confidence against Mr. de Blasio and the schools chancellor, Richard A. Carranza, on Sunday morning.Miranda Barbot, a spokeswoman for the city’s Department of Education, defended the reopening effort. “For the past six months, we’ve worked with our labor partners to navig
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