Photos show why Boeing was forced to stop production of its grounded 737 Max (BA)

A Boeing 737 Max airplane is seen parked at a Boeing facility on August 13 in Renton, Washington. David Ryder/Getty Images Boeing has announced that it will temporarily halt production of the 737 Max plane.The plane has been grounded by the FAA for almost a year after two major crashes.Boeing announced it would not be…

Photos show why Boeing was forced to stop production of its grounded 737 Max (BA)

A Boeing 737 Max airplane is seen parked at a Boeing facility on August 13 in Renton, Washington.

David Ryder/Getty Images

Boeing has announced that it will temporarily halt production of the 737 Max plane.The plane has been grounded by the FAA for almost a year after two major crashes.Boeing announced it would not be making any layoffs as a result of this decision and that employees would instead be redirected to other tasks.However, there is now an increasing backlog of uncompleted planes that are sitting in Boeing’s production line.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.Photos taken at a Boeing partner factory in Wichita, Kansas, show the growing number of uncompleted 737 Max planes that are backlogged on the plane maker’s production line now that the company has announced it will be suspending production of the controversial airplane model.These planes are now sitting idle as its grounding has hit the nine-month mark. Boeing said it now had about 400 planes in storage.”This decision is driven by a number of factors, including the extension of certification into 2020, the uncertainty about the timing and conditions of return to service and global training approvals, and the importance of ensuring that we can prioritize the delivery of stored aircraft,” Boeing said in a statement.¬†Boeing has about 680 suppliers and hundreds of other subcontractors working to create the 737 Max. While the company doesn’t have plans to lay off any of its own employees, there is fear that furloughs will begin with the suppliers that Boeing may stop paying, Reuters reported.This includes Spirit AeroSystems, which had enough factory workers to create 52 plane fuselages per month, and counting before the 737 Max groundings. Spirit is one of the largest 737 Max suppliers.Keep scrolling to see the grounded planes and what the effects of the production halt may have on Boeing’s suppliers and the US economy:

Boeing said it was prioritizing delivering the planes over continuing production.

Reuters

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