Charles Barkley: ‘Impossible’ for NBA to play in front of empty arenas, talks Lakers | THE HERD – The Herd with Colin Cowherd

Charles Barkley joins Colin Cowherd to discuss the postponed NBA season. Hear why he thinks the prospect of playing NBA games without fans is ‘impossible.’#TheHerd #NBA #Lakers #CharlesBarkleySUBSCRIBE to get all the latest content from The Herd: http://foxs.pt/SubscribeTHEHERD►Watch the latest content from The Herd: http://foxs.pt/LatestOnTheHerd ►Watch our favorite content on “Best of The Herd”: http://foxs.pt/BestOnTheHerd▶First Things First’s YouTube channel: http://foxs.pt/SubscribeFIRSTTHINGSFIRST?
Read More From Publisher

A third report a job loss, half a pay cut as coronavirus crisis grips the economy

Economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis are gripping the nation: One in three Americans in an ABC News/Washington Post poll say they or an immediate family member have been laid off or lost their job as a result of the pandemic, and more – half – report a cut in pay or work hours. Beyond…

Economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis are gripping the nation: One in three Americans in an ABC News/Washington Post poll say they or an immediate family member have been laid off or lost their job as a result of the pandemic, and more – half – report a cut in pay or work hours.

Beyond those stark realities, worries for the future are profound. A nearly unanimous 92% expect a recession because of the outbreak, with 59% calling this not just likely, but very likely. If one occurs, two-thirds think it will be as bad as the Great Recession, or worse. Already, in interviews Sunday through Wednesday, 43% say the economic impacts on their own community are severe.

See PDF for full results, charts and tables.

The survey’s result on job losses is reflected in the unprecedented level of new unemployment claims reported today by the federal government. But the claims data don’t reflect the broader public fears. Among those who haven’t yet experienced a job loss in their immediate family, 58% are concerned about it occurring. And 53% are concerned their family will be hit with pay cuts or reduced work hours.
The net totals mean that 71% of Americans either have had a layoff or job loss occur as a result of the pandemic, or are concerned about this; and 76% either have lost pay or work hours, or are concerned that this may happen.

Further, the survey finds higher levels of job losses and pay cuts among the most economically at-risk Americans: those with lower incomes, racial and ethnic minorities and, specifically in terms of job losses, women who lack a four-year college degree.

On another front, the public expresses broad support for some elements of the economic stimulus package approved unanimously by the Senate last night. Eighty-six percent back cash payments to most Americans and 90% support billions in aid to small businesses, with bipartisan views on both. Assistance for large corporations is far less popular, with support dropping to 46%.

Most interviews for this national survey were conducted Sunday and Monday in order to avoid potential call center shutdowns; the results are a portrait in time in the fast-moving crisis. While this report focuses on economic impacts,
Read More From Publisher

Salesforce’s Benioff pledges no ‘significant’ layoffs for 90 days

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outlined an eight-step plan to keep people safe and find treatments and a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus, all while working to find a way to get people back to work safely. He also asked that all CEOs take a 90-day “no lay off” pledge…

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outlined an eight-step plan to keep people safe and find treatments and a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus, all while working to find a way to get people back to work safely. He also asked that all CEOs take a 90-day “no lay off” pledge to help everyone get through the crisis.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsThe same day, he posted another tweet pledging to not make any “significant” layoffs for 90 days. When TechCrunch asked Salesforce to comment on the difference between the two tweets, the company chose not to comment any further on the matter and let the tweets stand on their own. Salesforce is pledging to its workforce Ohana not to conduct any significant lay offs over the next 90 days. We will continue to pay our hourly workers while o
Read More From Publisher

Salesforce’s Benioff pledges no ‘significant’ layoffs for 90s days

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outlined an eight-step plan to keep people safe and find treatments and a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus, all while working to find a way to get people back to work safely. He also asked that all CEOs take a 90-day “no lay off” pledge…

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outlined an eight-step plan to keep people safe and find treatments and a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus, all while working to find a way to get people back to work safely. He also asked that all CEOs take a 90-day “no lay off” pledge to help everyone get through the crisis.

The same day, he posted another tweet pledging to not make any “significant” layoffs for 90 days. When TechCrunch asked Salesforce to comment on the difference between the two tweets, the company chose not to comment any further on the matter and let the tweets stand on their own.

Salesforce is pledging to its workforce Ohana not to conduct any significant lay offs over the next 90 days. We will continue to pay our hourly workers while o
Read More From Publisher

‘It won’t be a robust recovery’: Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz warns the $2 trillion bailout package will fail to drive an immediate economic rebound

Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz in a Wednesday interview with Business Insider’s Sara Silverstein discussed the damage the coronavirus outbreak is inflicting on the US economy and what it might take to eventually rebound from the sudden shock. While he expects the US economy to rebound at some point, “it won’t be a robust recovery,” he…

Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz in a Wednesday interview with Business Insider’s Sara Silverstein discussed the damage the coronavirus outbreak is inflicting on the US economy and what it might take to eventually rebound from the sudden shock. While he expects the US economy to rebound at some point, “it won’t be a robust recovery,” he said. He worries that there are gaps in the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill making its way through Congress, he said. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.Nobel laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz is not anticipating a booming recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. 

In a Wednesday interview with Business Insider’s Sara Silverstein, Stiglitz discussed the damage the coronavirus outbreak is inflicting on the US economy and what it might take to eventually rebound from the sudden shock. Initially, there might be a quick recovery, Stiglitz said. “Not back to where we were, but remember, what shut down the economy was not failing banks, it was the disease, and once that goes away, people can go back to work.”He continued: “I expect while it’ll bounce back from the extremes of unemployment that we’re seeing now, it won’t be a robust recovery.” To combat the spread of COVID-19 cases, a number of states across the US have implemented drastic measures encouraging people to practice social distancing and shutting down non-essential businesses such as bars, restaurants, and museums. In addition, schools are closed, and millions of workers a
Read More From Publisher

Record Jobless Claims Are Overwhelming States’ Aging Tech

Christine Cemelli was at home on March 16 when she got the text. Her husband, a chef at a fine-dining restaurant in New Jersey, had been laid off. Earlier that day, Governor Phil Murphy had signed an executive order restricting the operations of non-essential businesses in an attempt to slow the spread of the novel…

Christine Cemelli was at home on March 16 when she got the text. Her husband, a chef at a fine-dining restaurant in New Jersey, had been laid off. Earlier that day, Governor Phil Murphy had signed an executive order restricting the operations of non-essential businesses in an attempt to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Restaurants could stay open for take-out and delivery orders only, but that didn’t make financial sense for her husband’s restaurant. Cemelli quickly launched into action.“Literally, as soon as he texted me that he was getting laid off, I jumped on the computer,” Cemelli recalls. She had seen reports of layoffs around the county in response to the pandemic, and knew that with each hour that passed, it could become more difficult for her husband to claim unemployment benefits.Cemelli began working her way through New Jersey’s online unemployment application system at 1pm. She got about halfway through the application before an unknown server error kicked her out. None of her work had been saved, so she started again from the beginning.Ten hours later, at 11pm, she was still trying desperately to submit a claim. The site was even buggier at that point, Cermelli says; she couldn’t make it two pages into the application before it crashed. She woke up early the next morning to try again, but no dice. She encountered the same issues in the afternoon and evening. Cermelli considered trying to apply over the phone, but was dissuaded after family members said they had found that even more difficult. The department was so overwhelmed with jobless claims that it was telling many callers to try again another day.Read all of our coronavirus coverage here.It’s a problem countless Americans have struggled with in recent weeks. As the Covid-19 pandemic sweeps across the nation, state and local officials have taken drastic measures to curb the spread of the disease. Nearly one in two Americans are now under orders to shelter in place, forcing the closure of all non-essential businesses and many layoffs. Even businesses that remain open, like the restaurant where Cemelli’s husband Brett works, are reducing their staffs. Unemployment offices are struggling to keep up.The US Department of Labor said on Thursday that a seasonally adjusted 3,283,000 people filed for unemployment last week, the highest total since the department started keeping track. Unemployment claims rose more than 10-fold from the prior week, and were more than four times higher than the previous record, in 1982. More Americans have lost their jobs in the last week than during the first year of the Great Recession. The employment carnage of other natural disasters, like Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, doesn’t even come close.The coming weeks are likely to be even worse, economists say. The figures released Thursday reflect claims from last week, when states like California, New York, and New Jersey issued shelter in place orders. But other states didn’t follow suit until more recently. Surges in unemployment claims in these states won’t be reflected in the most recent federal figure
Read More From Publisher

A record-shattering number of Americans filed for unemployment last week — here’s what the situation looks like in each state

A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits in the week ending March 21 as coronavirus-induced layoffs surge around the country. Some states have been hit harder than others, potentially due to individual orders to curb the spread of COVID-19. “Nearly every state providing comments cited the COVID-19 virus impacts,” the Labor Department wrote in the…

A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits in the week ending March 21 as coronavirus-induced layoffs surge around the country. Some states have been hit harder than others, potentially due to individual orders to curb the spread of COVID-19. “Nearly every state providing comments cited the COVID-19 virus impacts,” the Labor Department wrote in the report released Thursday.Here’s the situation in every state.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Some states have been hit harder than others by massive layoffs amid the coronavirus pandemic. In the week ending March 21, a record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, nearly 12 times the number just a week before. Every state posted an increase in unemployment filings in the same week, with some seeing
Read More From Publisher

American Express is waiving late fees and lowering interest rates for cardholders impacted by the coronavirus

If your income has been affected by the coronavirus outbreak and you’re no longer able to pay your bills, your credit card issuer may be able to help.American Express is offering assistance such as lower monthly payments, waived late fees, and temporarily lowered interest rates through its financial hardship program.You can contact Amex online via…

If your income has been affected by the coronavirus outbreak and you’re no longer able to pay your bills, your credit card issuer may be able to help.American Express is offering assistance such as lower monthly payments, waived late fees, and temporarily lowered interest rates through its financial hardship program.You can contact Amex online via its chat tool or call 1-866-703-4169 to discuss your options.See Business Insider’s list of the best credit cards with intro APR offers.Most credit card issuers run hardship programs meant to help customers through tough financial times, but they’re becoming more visible now th
Read More From Publisher

3.28 Million Americans Filed for Unemployment Last Week, Shattering Previous Record

Nearly 3.3 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week — more than quadruple the previous record set in 1982 — amid a widespread economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus. The surge in weekly applications was a stunning reflection of the damage the viral outbreak is doing to the economy. Filings for unemployment aid generally…

Nearly 3.3 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week — more than quadruple the previous record set in 1982 — amid a widespread economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus.
The surge in weekly applications was a stunning reflection of the damage the viral outbreak is doing to the economy. Filings for unemployment aid generally reflect the pace of layoffs.
The pace of layoffs is sure to accelerate as the U.S. economy sinks into a recession. Revenue has collapsed at restaurants, hotels
Read More From Publisher

US jobless claims balloon to record on coronavirus impact

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits shot to record of more than 3 million last week as strict measures to contain the coronavirus pandemic ground the country to a sudden halt, unleashing a wave of layoffs that likely brought an end to the longest employment boom in U.S.…

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits shot to record of more than 3 million last week as strict measures to contain the coronavirus pandemic ground the country to a sudden halt, unleashing a wave of layoffs that likely brought an end to the longest employment boom in U.S. history.[] A man crosses a nearly empty 5th Avenue in midtown Manhattan during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York City, New York, U.S., March 25, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar Initial claims for unemployment benefits rose to 3.28 million in the latest week from a revised 282,000 the previous week, eclipsing the previous record of 695,000 set in 1982, the U.S. Labor Department said on Thursday. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims would rise to 1 million, but estimates had ranged to as high as 4 million. The jobless blowout was announced shortly after Federal Reserve Chairman said on NBC’s Today Show that the U.S. “may well be in recession” but progress in controlling the spread of the coronavirus will dictate when the economy can fully reopen. His remarks were an unusual acknowledgement by a Fed chair that the economy may be contracting even before data confirms it. MARKETS: STOCKS: S&P 500 .SPX was up more than 1% shortly after the open, and the Dow .DJI rose more than 2% after futures EScv1 reversed early losses. TREASURIES: Yields rose slightly: The two-year note yield was last at 0.316% and the 10-year yield was at 0.803% DOLLAR: The US dollar index =USD extended a loss and was last off 0.82% COMMENTS: JAMES KNIGHTLEY, CHIEF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIST, ING (EMAIL NOTE TO CLIENTS) “Even in the knowledge that tens of thousands of businesses shuttered in response to Covid-19 containment measures, the 3.3 million spike in initial claims is still shocking.” “This is obviously the result of the city and state lockdowns that have been spreading across the US as a response to try to contain Covid-19. Pennsylvania reported the highest number of claims (378,900), with Ohio reporting 187,800, Illinois 114,700, California 186,800 and New York 80,300. “The latter two states seem low given anecdotal evidence, which may indeed reflect issues with websites crashing and phone lines jammed and a general reluctance of people to stand in line with lots of other claimants in the current environment. We would expect numbers from these states and others to climb in coming weeks, particularly with the number of lockdowns increasing across the US.” QUINCY KROSBY, CHIEF MARKET STRATEGIST, PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY “This is a record breaking number. The number has sent chills through the markets. If these numbers continue for three or four weeks, there will be demand for more fiscal support. Even monetary support from the Federal Reserve which ha
Read More From Publisher