More 737 Max fallout: Boeing to halt plane’s production in January, temporarily

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY Published 5:25 p.m. ET Dec. 16, 2019 | Updated 6:56 p.m. ET Dec. 16, 2019CLOSE FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson told House lawmakers the return of the Boeing 737 Max to service “is not guided by a calendar or schedule,” suggesting that regulators won’t clear the airplane to fly again for months.…

More 737 Max fallout: Boeing to halt plane’s production in January, temporarily

Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY
Published 5:25 p.m. ET Dec. 16, 2019 | Updated 6:56 p.m. ET Dec. 16, 2019CLOSE
FAA Administrator Stephen Dickson told House lawmakers the return of the Boeing 737 Max to service “is not guided by a calendar or schedule,” suggesting that regulators won’t clear the airplane to fly again for months. (Dec. 11)
APBoeing has planned a temporary shutdown of production of its 737 Max in January, as the timing of the grounded plane’s return remains murky more than nine months into the plane’s safety crisis.The company said in a statement it does not plan layoffs or furloughs at this time, but provided no other details on how long it will halt production. “We will continue to assess our progress towards return to service milestones and make determinations about resuming production and deliveries accordingly,” Boeing said.Boeing’s stock fell 4.3 percent Monday following weekend reports by the Wall Street Journal and others that it was planning production cuts or a temporary suspension of production.Beyond the impact on Boeing’s finances, there are broader economic concerns. Airplanes are made up of a huge number of parts from myriad suppliers, and the lack of production could hurt those companies and their workers and communities. The decision is unlikely to affect travelers, since airlines had already planned on delays in receiving their shipments of 737 Max planes. Boeing cut production of the Max from 52 planes a month to 42 in mid-April, a month after the plane was grounded following two crashes that killed 346 people. Is the Boeing 737 Max safe? 2 big reasons the plane is still grounded by FAA after crashesThe manufacturer has kept that production pace throughout the year, building a
Read More From Publisher