Leaked documents reveal Exxon changed its employee ranking system amid the coronavirus pandemic, putting more workers at risk of getting cut

Carlos Jasso/Reuters This story is available exclusively on Business Insider Prime. Join BI Prime and start reading now. Leaked documents reveal Exxon Mobil made changes to its internal employee ranking system in April, exposing a much larger portion of its staff to performance-based cuts. In May, Exxon’s CEO said the company did not have layoff plans.…

Leaked documents reveal Exxon changed its employee ranking system amid the coronavirus pandemic, putting more workers at risk of getting cut

Carlos Jasso/Reuters

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Leaked documents reveal Exxon Mobil made changes to its internal employee ranking system in April, exposing a much larger portion of its staff to performance-based cuts. In May, Exxon’s CEO said the company did not have layoff plans. Four former employees and one current employee claim that the company is obscuring layoffs in performance-based cuts. “We do not have a target to reduce headcount through our talent management process,” an Exxon representative said. “Employees who need significant improvement (NSI) are given a plan and opportunities to improve their performance.”Almost all major oil companies have taken aggressive action to weather the downturn wrought by the coronavirus pandemic, which sent the price of oil tumbling. Are you a current or former Exxon employee? Reach out to this reporter at bjones@businessinsider.com or through the secure messaging app Signal at 646-768-1657.For more stories like this, sign up here for our weekly energy newsletter, Power Line.

Oil giant Exxon Mobil, challenged by a collapse in oil prices, made changes to the way it assesses employee performance in order to cut more workers without using traditional layoffs, according to current and former employees and documents seen by Business Insider.Exxon ranks its salaried employees based on their performance, according to the documents, five former workers, and one current employee. Employees at the lowest rank, called “Needs Significant Improvement (NSI),” are at risk of being cut.In April, Exxon expanded the number of employees required to be placed in that lowest category, the documents show, potentially putting 8% or more of salaried US workers at risk of losing their job.Click here to subscribe to Power Line, Business Insider’s weekly energy newsletter.”We have a rigorous talent management process which routinely assesses employee performance,” Ashley Alemayehu, an Exxon representative, said in a statement to Business Insider. “We do not have a target to reduce headcount through our talent management process. Employees who need significant improvement (NSI) are given a plan and opportunities to improve their performance.”Oil companies have been hammered this year by the coronavirus pandemic, which sapped demand for fuel and sent the price of oil into a downward tailspin. Today, a barrel of Brent, the international benchmark, is down about 34% since the start of the year.Every major oil company has taken aggressive action to weather the downturn, including Exxon. In early June, BP said it would lay off 10,000 workers, citing the coronavirus pandemic, while Chevron announced job cuts of a similar size.Read more: Layof
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