In defense of Uber laying off another 435 employees

Uber, which is deep in retrenchment mode after a long-awaited public offering that hasn’t yet panned out all that well, cut another 435 jobs today (Sept. 10). It’s trimming 8% of the staff in its engineering and product groups, on top of the 400 people laid off in July from the company’s global marketing team.It’s…

In defense of Uber laying off another 435 employees

Uber, which is deep in retrenchment mode after a long-awaited public offering that hasn’t yet panned out all that well, cut another 435 jobs today (Sept. 10). It’s trimming 8% of the staff in its engineering and product groups, on top of the 400 people laid off in July from the company’s global marketing team.It’s tempting to view the news as righteous comeuppance for a company that arguably grew too fast from the get-go. The pursuit of that growth encouraged Uber’s long history of flouting the rules, and of tolerating a toxic culture that Uber itself now sees as a risk to its business.But bask in the schadenfreude at your own risk. Setting aside the morality of taking pleasure in seeing hundreds of laypeople lose their job, you might consider, for a moment, the management call that led to these layoffs.According to a statement Uber provided to TechCrunch, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi asked everyone on his leadership team whether they would replicate the departmental organizations they have today if they were to design them from scratch. “After careful consi
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