HUD is suspending evictions and foreclosures for people living on its properties amid the coronavirus pandemic

The Department of Housing and Urban Development has halted all evictions and foreclosures until May 1 amid the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump said Wednesday.The order only applies to HUD-owned properties. There are roughly 6.7 million residents in HUD housing.Housing advocates and attorneys across the country are demanding a nationwide moratorium on evictions and foreclosures.Visit…

HUD is suspending evictions and foreclosures for people living on its properties amid the coronavirus pandemic

The Department of Housing and Urban Development has halted all evictions and foreclosures until May 1 amid the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump said Wednesday.The order only applies to HUD-owned properties. There are roughly 6.7 million residents in HUD housing.Housing advocates and attorneys across the country are demanding a nationwide moratorium on evictions and foreclosures.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump announced a new measure to protect tenants and homeowners, suspending all eviction and foreclosure action for properties owned by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.The suspension will end May 1, Trump said at a press conference, providing “immediate relief to renters and homeowners.”Around 6.7 million people lived in HUD-provided housing, according to government data from 2016, the most recent year with data available. And the surge in layoffs as businesses shutter amid the coronavirus pandemic means that many may struggle to pay their rent.”Today’s actions will allow households who have an FHA-insured mortgage to meet the challenges of COVID-19 without fear of losing their homes, and help steady market concerns,” HUD Secretary Ben Carson said in a statement.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson speaks during a briefing on coronavirus in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, Saturday, March 14, 2020, in Washington.

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

The new federal measure does not apply to the more than 80 million renters across the nation — though housing advocates and attorneys across the country are demanding a nationwide mor
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