How To Prepare For A Layoff Now

Getty As the coronavirus crisis escalates, layoffs are sadly mounting. Last week, 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number of initial jobless claims since the U.S. Department of Labor started tracking these numbers in 1967. And Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis economists say the pandemic could lead to 47 million lost jobs…

How To Prepare For A Layoff Now

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As the coronavirus crisis escalates, layoffs are sadly mounting. Last week, 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number of initial jobless claims since the U.S. Department of Labor started tracking these numbers in 1967. And Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis economists say the pandemic could lead to 47 million lost jobs in America.
“Most economists now expect a major recession,” says Jed Kolko, chief economist for Indeed.com. “Some companies have already announced layoffs, and we’ve seen the trend in job postings start to decline on the Indeed site.”
Some of those jobs — hopefully most — will return. But in the meantime, it’s wise to take key steps to prepare for a possible layoff and shore up your career. Here are nine suggestions:
1. Focus intently on your job, while you have one. Admittedly, this is easier said than done. But with layoffs sharply escalating, now is not the time to ease up at work. Otherwise, you could make yourself more of a target to your employer.

If possible, offer to lighten the workload for a co-worker who is sick or caring for a loved one due to the pandemic.

It’s now critical to demonstrate your productivity, especially if you work remotely (when some bosses wrongly assume employees aren’t putting in the normal effort). Respond promptly to emails from colleagues. Show up for virtual meetings on time and well-prepared. Stay on top of deadlines and deliverables.
Also on Forbes:

If possible, offer to lighten the workload for a co-worker who is sick or caring for a loved one due to the pandemic.
Of course, no amount of diligence will guarantee your job. But it’s your best defense when or if your employer must make job-cut decisions.
2. Update your LinkedIn
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profile and resumé to include your latest accomplishments, skills and credentials. Eliminate any information that’s no longer relevant, such as dated technology skills.
If you’re a job seeker over 50, it’s especially important to follow the recommendations noted in my previous post, “How to Age-Proof Your Resume and LinkedIn Profile.“
3. Practice using video technology for potential video job interviews. Odds are, for the foreseeable future, many employers will be using video interviews to screen candi
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