Here’s how some Times-Picayune journalists said goodbye to New Orleans

Since learning that most of the staff would get laid off when The New Orleans Advocate bought and absorbed The Times-Picayune, journalists there have been sharing memories, layoff anxieties and love for their newsroom and city on social media. (Poynter reported Monday that of the 65 in the newsroom, 10 were moving to The Advocate.)…

Here’s how some Times-Picayune journalists said goodbye to New Orleans

Since learning that most of the staff would get laid off when The New Orleans Advocate bought and absorbed The Times-Picayune, journalists there have been sharing memories, layoff anxieties and love for their newsroom and city on social media. (Poynter reported Monday that of the 65 in the newsroom, 10 were moving to The Advocate.)
On Twitter, they looked back:

My @NOLAnews journey to being city columnist was a little circuitous, but one of the most rewarding aspects has been to be a part of the crime team, led by @dzsamuels.
1/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

I’ve gotten to see this group of reporters & photogs prioritize telling the stories of the people who come face to face with one of New Orleans’ biggest challenges: curbing its crime statistics.
2/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

There’s a thing that happens to our team with shocking regularity: They get recognized at crime scenes. A lot. It’s always jarring for our younger reporters, but it eventually happens bc we send them to every single homicide and nearly all shootings.
3/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

A little more than a year ago, I started serving as the breaking news (read: crime) editor on Sunday nights. It’s been a painful but incredible education ever since.
4/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

I don’t have many nights like this — listening to the police scanner, taking reports from our team in the field, ensuring breaking news alerts get sent to your phones — left at The Times-Picayune.
5/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

They’ve been humbling, heartbreaking and sometimes beautiful, but I’m so thankful they were part of my journey here.
6/6
— chelsea brasted (@cabrasted) June 16, 2019

Well, so I didn’t PLAN to tear up before noon today. 😭 I’m really going to miss this newsroom. It’s a newsroom that really understood the importance of community engagement and building, and how it helps us achieve our journalistic mission. It made my job easy. https://t.co/u2rBWznY4Z
— Haley Correll (@HaleyCorrell) June 15, 2019

It’s been three days and the news regarding our layoffs at the Times-Picayune has finally hit me.
It hit me like a freight train at about 1:30 this morning. I wasn’t ready. And I’m still not.
I was one of our shortest-tenured reporters, but that didn’t matter.
— Amie Just (@Amie_Just) May 5, 2019

The Times-Picayune and Baton Rouge are home. I fell in love with Louisiana when I visited back in pre-Katrina 2005. The Times-Picayune’s coverage of Katrina made working for the T-P one of my dream destinations.
When I was hired in October, I joked that I “peaked too fast”…
— Amie Just (@Amie_Just) May 5, 2019

… Because I’d already worked for two of my top three newspapers that I charted as a kid.
But now, I just feel empty. This wasn’t my hometown paper. I didn’t work here for 35 years, let alone a full year, but NOLA became my home. I was finally happy. And that’s why this hurts.
— Amie Just (@Amie_Just) May 5, 2019

Will I be OK? Of course. I have faith that things will pan out for us all. But in the short time I’ve been here, the Times-Picayune staff and the LSU beat became my family.
I don’t know what the future holds, but I know my NOLA colleagues will forever have a place in my heart. pic.twitter.com/8s0PJIx1sa
— Amie Just (@Amie_Just) May 5, 2019

I can’t encapsulate all of my emotions on Twitter, so instead I’ll share with you a brief narrative about my life as I mull over the recent purchase of @NOLAnews | The Times-Picayune: The Times-Picayune is the first newspaper I read growing up in New Orleans. (Cont.)
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

I’ve always been a storyteller, but it wasn’t until 2006 that I realized I wanted to be a journalist. That year, a Times-Picayune writer interviewed 14-year-old me about my grief counseling experience in Japan after Hurricane Katrina. 📸@susanpoag and @MichaelDeMocker (Cont.) pic.twitter.com/BkCqoOKsjl
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

He told me to keep reading and writing if I wanted his job someday. I followed his advice and years later it paid off in 2016.
Since then, I’ve received an invaluable amount of experience and knowledge from editors, photographers, videographers, reporters and many more. (Cont.)
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

Working at my hometown paper was always my dream job. Whether it was reporting on crime, infrastructure, politics, or education, I’ve tried to do right by my city even when that effort wasn’t reciprocated by her. I don’t know what lies ahead for me five years from now. (Cont.)
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

But I’m not as anxious about my future as I was at age 14 after my mother’s death in 2005. That lack of anxiety today is due in part to the people who have helped me grow into a better journalist and human being. (Cont.)
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

I have faith in the ability of my invaluable colleagues. I know they will bounce back from this. I still have a job for a few weeks and I have a few more stories in the works about my city and its people, so I’m not out of here yet. (Cont.)
— Wilborn P. Nobles III (@WilNobles) May 3, 2019

This is the first time I’ve experienced something like this, so I thank those of you who have
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