Electric scooter startup Bird has laid off 30% of the company in a scramble to preserve a ‘cash runway’ to last until the end of 2021

Scooter startup Bird cut almost a third of its workforce in an online call on Friday morning, as the cash-guzzling startup prepares for the ‘black swan’ event to dry up funding. “Due to the financial and operational impact of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, we are saying goodbye to about 30% of our team,” a memo from…

Scooter startup Bird cut almost a third of its workforce in an online call on Friday morning, as the cash-guzzling startup prepares for the ‘black swan’ event to dry up funding. “Due to the financial and operational impact of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, we are saying goodbye to about 30% of our team,” a memo from Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden, circulated around the company, said. Bird said it is providing four weeks of pay, three months of health coverage and an extended time frame of 12 months for laid-off workers to exercise their stock options. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Electric scooter startup Bird, which raised $275 million in funding six months ago, is laying off about one-third of its staff as it races to slash costs amid the coronavirus outbreak that has stunted its business.The three-year old company, based in Santa Monica, Calif., did not say how many employees were affected by the layoffs but told Business Insider they amounted to 30% of the company’s staff. Bird said the affected employees, who have been working at home because of the pandemic, were notified of the layoffs on a web call on Friday morning.As companies reckon with layoffs at a time when staff are working at home, some have broken the news to affected employees by using Zoom video conference calls. But Bird said that it made sure the video feature on the web call was switched off
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Bird lays off about 30% of workforce amid COVID-19 pandemic

Bird is the latest startup hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, Bird laid off about 30% of its employees amid the uncertainty caused by the coronavirus, TechCrunch has learned. “The unprecedented COVID-19 crisis has forced our leadership team and the board of directors to make many extremely difficult and painful decisions relating to some of…

Bird is the latest startup hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, Bird laid off about 30% of its employees amid the uncertainty caused by the coronavirus, TechCrunch has learned.
“The unprecedented COVID-19 crisis has forced our leadership team and the board of directors to make many extremely difficult and painful decisions relating to some of your teammates,” Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden wrote to staffers in a memo, obtained by TechCrunch, today. “As you know, we’ve had to pause many markets around the world and drastically cut spending. Due to the financial and operational impact of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, we are saying goodbye to about 30% of our team.”
Bird has confirmed the layoffs and says it is providing four weeks of pay, three months of health coverage* and an extended time frame of 12 months to exercise their stock options. According to a source, Bird’s balance sheet is strong but it needed to reduce burn in order to extend its runway into 2021.
Bird’s layoffs come shortly after news broke that Lime is looking for a funding round that would cut its valuation from $2.4 billion to $400 million.
Last week Bird and Lime suspended their respective services in response to the pandemic.
Bird is not the only startup forced to have layoffs amid the crisis. As The Information reported earlier this week, layoffs are accelerating across Silicon Valley. Meanwhile, Lime is reportedly considering laying off up to 70 people in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Here’s the full memo VanderZanden sent this morning:

We’ve watched the COVID-19 pandemic radically and quickly transform our lives, the world, and our business in less than a month. This once in a decade black swan event presents one of the greatest challenges in history because of the viral impact it has not just on our health, but also on our lives—our families, friends, communities, finances, work, emotions—the list goes on.
The unprecedented COVID-19 crisis has forc
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OneWeb to file for bankruptcy as effort to securing funding, including from investor Softbank, falls through

Broadband constellation satellite operator OneWeb will file for bankruptcy protection in the U.S., likely some time Friday, after attempts to secure new funding, including from existing investor SoftBank, fell through, TechCrunch has learned. The Financial Times also reported on the failure of its funding attempt on Friday, based on its own separate sources. The company…

Broadband constellation satellite operator OneWeb will file for bankruptcy protection in the U.S., likely some time Friday, after attempts to secure new funding, including from existing investor SoftBank, fell through, TechCrunch has learned. The Financial Times also reported on the failure of its funding attempt on Friday, based on its own separate sources. The company will be laying off most of its staff, with a team remaining in place to continue to operate its existing satellites in space, according to our sources.
OneWeb, founded in 2012 as WorldVu Satellites, had been seeking to build out a constellation of broadband internet satellites that would operate in low Earth orbit, providing low-cost connections to customers on the ground with coverage that extends into more remote and hard-to reach areas that are not addressed by current ground-based networks.
Ear
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Layoffs, furloughs, and spending cuts: We’re tracking how oil giants from Exxon to Halliburton are responding to the historic price shock

Oil and gas companies are slashing their 2020 budgets and letting staff go in response to the recent oil price shock. Here, a flare burns off gas from a gas plant near Wink, Texas U.S. Nick Oxford/Reuters This story is available exclusively on Business Insider Prime. Join BI Prime and start reading now. The novel…

Oil and gas companies are slashing their 2020 budgets and letting staff go in response to the recent oil price shock. Here, a flare burns off gas from a gas plant near Wink, Texas U.S.

Nick Oxford/Reuters

This story is available exclusively on Business Insider Prime.
Join BI Prime and start reading now.

The novel coronavirus continues to cripple the global demand for oil, driving down the price to 17-year lows.Oil companies are among those that will be hurt the most. The breakeven oil price for an average company’s cash flow is $25, about where the US benchmark has hovered this week. Many oil and gas giants have already slashed capital spending, laid off or furloughed staff, and changed their production targets.Business Insider is tracking how top companies are responding to the oil price shock and will update this story as news breaks. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

“Cheap oil has killed nearly 200,000 US jobs.” That was a CNN headline four years ago — the last time oil prices tanked, falling from over $100 in 2014 to just over $30 in 2016. Though the forces at play today are unprecedented, the trend for oil is similar.Since the start of the year, the price of Brent crude has fallen by about 60%,  from more than $60 to under $30 a barrel earlier this month, in response to a shock in demand and a price war playing out between Saudi Arabia and Russia. And Wall Street analysts are now predicting it could get much worse, as demand continues to crater in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. 

“We expect a further sharp sell-off in oil prices in coming weeks,” Goldman Sachs said in a note published on Wednesday. “Such a hit on production will not be reversed quickly.” The virus is crippling businesses almost across the board, but the oil industry — home to many of the world’s largest companies — is reeling from one of the biggest blows.For the average company, the breakeven price for free cash flow is $25 a barrel, according to the research firm Rystad Energy, and the US benchmark, WTI, has been at or below that since March 18.In response, several oil and gas companies like Apache and Halliburton are trimming or furloughing staff, while nearly all of them have slashed their capital spending by more than 10%. Click here to subscribe to Power Line, Business Insider’s weekly energy newsletter.

“I knew it was part of what I signed up for,” said a former employee of oil and gas exploration company Apache who was laid off last Thursday. “I knew there were past downturns, and I knew it was going to happen again.” In fact, more than a million oilfield service jobs are likely to be cut this year, according to Rystad Energy. Business Insider is keeping track of how top oil and gas companies are responding to the price collapse. Companies are listed below in order from smallest to largest market capitalization as of Thursday night. Have you or an acquaintance been laid off by an oil company? Please contact us at energy@businessinsider.com or through the secure message app Signal at (646) 768-1657. 

Whiting Petroleum — $87 million

A drill of Whiting Petroleum in Stanley, North Dakota

Germain MOYON/AFP via Getty Images

What it is: An oil and gas exploration and production company with large projects in North Dakota and Colorado. Employment changes: “Whiting expects to drop one rig and one completion crew within the next month,” the company said in a public statement released on March 16.Spending cuts: The company said it’s slashing its capital budget by 30%, down to $400 million to $435 million, for 2020. Production cuts: “The capital reduction is projected to have a moderate impact on full-year 2020 total production and oil production,” the company said, though it didn’t specify what that means in barrels. 

Apache — $2.2 billion

A rig contracted by the oil and gas exploration company Apache

Terry Wade/Reuters

What it is: A large oil and gas exploration and production company, headquartered in Houston, Texas. Employment changes: Apache is planning to lay off 85 people in Midland, Texas, state filings show. “We are lowering our Permian rig count to zero and focusing capital elsewhere in our portfolio and, as a result, have made the difficult decision to further reduce staff,” Apache said in a statement. “We are working to support affected employees.”Spending cuts: Apache is planning to reduce its 2020 capital investment by as much $900,000, down to $1 billion to $1.2 billion, the company said in a public statement. The oil and gas exploration company is also slashing its dividend payments — from $0.25 to $0.025 per share. “The company will use the $340 million of cash retained annually from the dividend reduction to further strengthen its financial position.”Have you or an acquaintance been laid off by an oil company? Please contact us at energy@businessinsider.com or through the secure message app Signal at (646) 768-1657. 

Continental Resources — $3.7 billion

Wikimedia Commons

What it is: An oil and gas exploration and production company, and the largest leaseholder in the Bakken oilfield of North Dakota and Montana. Employment changes: The company has not announced any layoffs or furloughs but it is shrinking its rig count, which could result in changes to its workforce.Spending cuts: The company said it would slash capital spending by more than 50%, down to $1.2 billion from an original planned $2.7 billion. Production cuts: Continental is shrinking its rig count from nine to three in the Bakken Oilfield in the northern US, and from 10.5 to four in Oklahoma, it said in a public statement. 

Diamondback Energy — $4.1 billion

Travis Stice, the CEO of Diamondback Energy

Nick Oxford/Reuters

What it is: An oil and gas exploration and production company operating in the Permian Basin. Employment changes: No layoffs or furloughs have been reported so far, but earlier this month the company said that it’s “reducing activity immediately from nine completion crews to six and expects to drop two drilling rigs in April 2020 and a third later in the second quarter of 2020.”Spending cuts: Diamondback is cutting its 2020 capital budget by $1.2 billion, down to between $1.5 billion and $1.9 billion, and it’s “prepared to decrease its budget further should commodity prices remain weak,” the company said in a public statement. Production cuts: The company expects production to decline through the end of the year, with “full-year oil production lower than fourth quarter 2019 oil production of 195,000 barrels per day.”

Halliburton — $6.2 billion

The oilfield services company Halliburto
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Stocks fall sharply Friday morning as the mid-week recovery falls short

The major American stock market indices are down sharply this morning at the open, with stocks falling after a multi-day rally helped shave some losses off their calendar-year results. So far, 2020 has proven to be a toxic year for publicly traded equity, as a decade-long bull market collided with a global pandemic and stark…

The major American stock market indices are down sharply this morning at the open, with stocks falling after a multi-day rally helped shave some losses off their calendar-year results. So far, 2020 has proven to be a toxic year for publicly traded equity, as a decade-long bull market collided with a global pandemic and stark economic slowdown around the world.
This week it became known that around 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits this week, a record-setting figure that dwarfs tallies set in during the 2008-era economic meltdown. Shares rose in the wake of that news; today’s losses could point towards a less optimistic view of the layoffs, the global c
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The coronavirus stimulus package will be doomed to fail if it can’t pass this simple 3-question test

Paul Constant is a writer at Civic Ventures, a cofounder of the Seattle Review of Books, and a frequent cohost of the “Pitchfork Economics” podcast with Nick Hanauer.He acknowledges that we’re in uncharted territory — never before have we experienced such a complete economic full-stop.When it comes to a coronavirus stimulus package, it needs to pass…

Paul Constant is a writer at Civic Ventures, a cofounder of the Seattle Review of Books, and a frequent cohost of the “Pitchfork Economics” podcast with Nick Hanauer.He acknowledges that we’re in uncharted territory — never before have we experienced such a complete economic full-stop.When it comes to a coronavirus stimulus package, it needs to pass a three-question test: Is the policy immediate, impactful, and inclusive?Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As federal and state officials continue to debate the proper economic relief response to the coronavirus pandemic, we have to accept the disturbing fact that we are living through a unique moment in history. Literally nobody has ever, in the history of the world, had to respond to an economic full-stop at this scale before. The path ahead is uncharted.That said, this crisis has proven that certain economic principles are just as true now as they’ve always been, and those principles provide guideposts for how we should address the crisis. We know these widespread layoffs and business closures were caused because the true drivers of the economy — the consumers who generate economic demand and create jobs — have to stop participating in the economy to protect public health. In the latest episode of “Pitchfork Economics,” Nick Hanauer and David Goldstein argue that to get the economy back on track — indeed, to make the economy stronger and more durable than ever before — we have to do everything we can to increase consumer demand, to circulate money through the economy. And we have to make sure that Main Street, not Wall Street, is restored as quickly as possible.To do that, here’s a simple three-question test that we should apply to every proposed policy and stimulus package. If it doesn’t meet these three standards, the policy should be scrapped:Does the policy offer immediate relief to the American working class?Is the policy impactful on a scale that meets the size of the problem?Is the policy as inclusive as possible, helping Americans who have been left in the margins and broadly encouraging participation in the economy?

Running a policy through the “three i” test provides instantaneous clarity to a policy’s effectiveness.For instance, it was obvious that the failed Senate Republican plan to give half a trillion dollars to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to hand out to corporations in secret, at his own discretion, and with no protections for workers, failed both the inclusivity and immediacy portions of the test. While the Mnuchin plan was very large in scale, its trickle-down mechanism does
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Flight attendant based in Philadelphia has died after testing positive for coronavirus; Pa. universities likel – The Philadelphia Inquirer

Latest 12:33 PM – 03/27/20 12:33 PM – March 27, 2020 Latest Pope Francis to offer special blessings via livestream As the coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, Pope Francis will offer prayers and a special blessing today in an unprecedented service before an empty square outside St. Peter’s Basilica. The Pope’s extraordinary Urbi…

Latest 12:33 PM – 03/27/20 12:33 PM – March 27, 2020 Latest Pope Francis to offer special blessings via livestream As the coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, Pope Francis will offer prayers and a special blessing today in an unprecedented service before an empty square outside St. Peter’s Basilica. The Pope’s extraordinary Urbi et Orbi (“from the city to world”) blessing — usually only imparted at Christmas and Easter — will be live-streamed at 1 p.m. Eastern (6 p.m. Rome time) and beamed across the world. The moment of prayer is expected to last about an hour.You can watch the Pope’s service here: 12:28 PM – 03/27/20 12:28 PM – March 27, 2020 Republican forces full vote on coronavirus stimulus bill J. Scott Applewhite / AP In this file photo from Thursday, July 7, 2016, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., left, and Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., listen to FBI Director James Comey during a House Oversight Committee hearing at the Capitol in Washington. Meadows, currently President Donald Trump’s acting-chief of staff, is still the sitting representative of North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District in the House of Representatives as the body prepares to vote on massive relief funding to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, Friday, March 27, 2020. Party leaders had hoped to pass the measure by voice vote without lawmakers having to take the risk of traveling to Washington, but that plan might be complicated by Massie who could force a roll call vote. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, file) Rep. Thomas Massie (R., Ky.) followed through on his threat to force a full floor vote in the House on the $2.2 trillion stimulus bill Friday. House leaders had hoped to pass the bill by a voice vote, which would have prevented vulnerable members from traveling to Washington, D.C. There is wide, bipartisan support for the legislation, so Massie’s move is only expected to delay the bill’s passage in the House. 12:25 PM – 03/27/20 12:25 PM – March 27, 2020 Philadelphia reports second coronavirus-related death A second Philadelphia resident has died as a result of the coronavirus, according to figures released Friday by the state Department of Health. No details were yet available. The city announced earlier this week that the first city resident known to have died of the coronavirus was a male patient in his 50s with an underlying medical condition. 11:50 AM – 03/27/20 11:50 AM – March 27, 2020 Gov. Wolf signs bill moving Pa. primary election to June 2 AP A member of the Pa. House of Representatives casts a vote on the postponement of the April election, Tuesday, March 24, 2020. The House session will be the first in state history where members can vote remotely due to the coronavirus outbreak. (Joe Hermitt/The Patriot-News via AP) June 2 is shaping up to be the Super Tuesday of postponed primaries. Pennsylvania will join 11 states and the District of Columbia in voting that day, after rescheduling its primary due to the coronavirus. Gov. Wolf on Friday signed a bill passed through the Pennsylvania legislature to move the primary back six weeks to allow enough time for people to register to vote by mail, for polling locations to shift, and to give election officials time to prepare for an election taking place in unprecedented circumstances. The law also authorizes county election officials to close and consolidate polling places without the usual court approval. (Officials had asked for that flexibility, as they’ve lost polling places and poll workers due to concerns over the coronavirus.) With Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland and D.C. also voting June 2, it’s been dubbed the Acela Primary. While the moves are unlikely to derail former Vice President Joe Biden from winning the Democratic nomination, it does mean he’ll need more time to clinch it. Meanwhile, the delay could hurt some candidates running for the state legislature who have limited campaign resources they now need to stretch. For election officials, it’s a welcome extension to prepare for an election that keeps voters and poll workers safe. 11:40 AM – 03/27/20 11:40 AM – March 27, 2020 House leaders hoping to vote on $2.2 trillion coronavirus rescue package at noon House leaders will attempt to pass the $2.2 trillion stimulus bill by voice vote at noon, but their plans might be upended by Rep. Thomas Massie (R., Ky.), who has said he plans to object and force a full floor vote. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi had hoped to pass the measure without a full floor vote to protect vulnerable members of Congress, some of whom are home in states mandating stay-at-home rules. If Massie or any other member objects, a quorum of 216 lawmakers would be required to vote on the legislation. Several lawmakers from the region, including Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J.) and Rep. Jeff Van Drew (R., N.J.), were present on the House floor Friday morning. Pennsylvania Rep Chrissy Houlahan (D., Pa.) drove to Washington, D.C. on Thursday afternoon in case her vote was needed. One local member of congress who won’t take part in a vote is Rep. Andy Kim (D., N.J.), who is in his last day of self-quarantine after coming into contact with a colleague who tested positive for coronavirus. It’s unclear if Massie will follow through on this threat, which has been condemned by politicians from both parties. That includes President Trump, who called for Republicans to throw the Kentucky congressman “out of the Republican Party!” Update, 12:28 p.m.: Rep. Thomas Massie (R., Ky.) followed through on his threat to force a full floor vote in the House on the $2.2 trillion stimulus bill Friday. House leaders had hoped to pass the bill by a voice vote, which would have prevented vulnerable members from traveling to Washington, D.C. — Rob Tornoe and Jonathan Tamari 10:50 AM – 03/27/20 10:50 AM – March 27, 2020 Owner of 7 Philly radio stations instituting pay-cuts in face of coronavirus economic setbacks Beasley Media Group is instituting company-wide pay cuts and reducing the hours of some employees as the radio company grapples with the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. Beasley — which owns seven stations in Philadelphia, including 93.3 WMMR and 97.5 The Fanatic — is cutting wages 10% for salaried full-time employees, and reducing hours for full-time hourly workers by 10%. The cuts go into effect April 1 and will continue through the end of June. Most hosts are salaried, meaning they will continue to host their daily shows as usual. “While it is not something we want to do, it is necessary in the long-term as we continue to move forward to get to the other side of the current economic situation,” CEO Caroline Beasley wrote, adding she will be forgoing 20% of her compensation through the end of the second quarter. 10:20 AM – 03/27/20 10:20 AM – March 27, 2020 Megabus suspends service in and out of hard-hit New York City LUKE RAFFERTY / Staff Photographer A Megabus near 30th Street Station, in 2018. Megabus has suspended service in and out of New York City, America’s largest coronavirus outbreak hotspot, through at least April 9, the company said in a message on its website. The move was made “in an abundance of cau
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California emits latest layoff statistics. March’s numbers are ugly. It’s 19,000 total, including many in tech

Symantec, Cisco, Uber, loathsome Juul, others shed staff amid pandemic California, home of Silicon Valley, has released its latest figures on job losses in the US state, and it’s not pretty. These numbers emerge as 3.28 million people nationwide filed for unemployment benefits in one week, quadruple the previous record, after businesses reacted to the…

Symantec, Cisco, Uber, loathsome Juul, others shed staff amid pandemic

California, home of Silicon Valley, has released its latest figures on job losses in the US state, and it’s not pretty.
These numbers emerge as 3.28 million people nationwide filed for unemployment benefits in one week, quadruple the previous record, after businesses reacted to the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus.
Cali’s latest Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) statistics [PDF] cover July 2019 to March 25, 2020. And as the table below shows, March has not been a good month due to the ongoing pandemic and other reasons.

July 2019
4,400
August 2019
9,705
Sept 2019
9,443
October 2019
7,769
Nov 2019
7,522
Dec 2019
2,766
January 2020
7,641
February 2020
7,164
March 2020
18,998

The report also confirms some
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At agencies, furloughs are the new layoffs

As agencies look for ways to survive amid the economic downturn and uncertainty ahead due to the coronavirus, they are now among the companies currently exploring whether to layoff or furlough employees.Furloughs can be a little more attractive for agencies, as it allows them to retain staff while reducing overhead and save cash. With agencies…

As agencies look for ways to survive amid the economic downturn and uncertainty ahead due to the coronavirus, they are now among the companies currently exploring whether to layoff or furlough employees.Furloughs can be a little more attractive for agencies, as it allows them to retain staff while reducing overhead and save cash. With agencies being a people business, keeping talent on staff while mitigating balance sheet risk is much more attractive than losing that talent altogether with a layoff.

“A lot of clients are postponing projects, not canceling them, so furloughs help agencies navigate this fallow period whilst also setting everyone up for work again on the other side of this,” said one agency CEO who requested anonymity. “Agencies imagine that they’ll need those employees again when this is all over.”

There is no one-size-fits-all. The definition of a furlough varies by state, as labor laws are different from California to New York to Washington and so forth, but generally a furlough is a leave of absence of some kind. For some, a furlough could mean their agency has asked them to use their paid leave now. For others, it could be that they’re on unpaid leave but they’re able to retain medical benefits.

How agencies employ a furlough will differ based on the agency and state laws but industry experts say that with a furlough it’s likely agencies are more optimistic about the ability to have that employee return to full-time work in the near future. One agency exec shared that he’s been in conversation with other agency heads who are exploring the possibility of staff furloughs for that very reason. 

“Agencies are trying to be as people first as they possibly can,” said Nancy Hill, founder of Media Sherpas and former 4A’s president. “We already had a war for talent going on before all this started. The last thing you want to do is lose really good people that you recruited and to never be able to get them back. You want to do everything you can to retain that top talent during this crisis.”

To deal with the tough months ahead, agencies are exploring all their options including asking employees to take paid time off now or to do shortened workweeks (i.e. a four-day work week and 80% of their salary). With paid time off in particular, agencies exploring that
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A staffing agency that hires nannies and chefs for ultra-wealthy families at 6-figure salaries says it’s been ‘inundated’ by laid-off restaurant workers desperate for work

Chefs and waiters who’ve been laid off because of the coronavirus are looking to ultrawealthy families as new employers, a New York staffing agency told Business Insider.A record-shattering 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits in the week ending March 21 alone, as authorities closed nonessential businesses to slow the spread of the virus.Since being…

Chefs and waiters who’ve been laid off because of the coronavirus are looking to ultrawealthy families as new employers, a New York staffing agency told Business Insider.A record-shattering 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits in the week ending March 21 alone, as authorities closed nonessential businesses to slow the spread of the virus.Since being identified in Wuhan, China, in December, the novel coronavirus has infected at least 511,000 people and killed over 23,000 worldwide.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The staffs of high-end restaurants who can’t work from home during the coronavirus crisis have found a new way to make ends meet as their workplaces shutter and lay them off at record rates by working in the home of an ultrawealthy family.A New York staffing agency that hires butlers, chefs, nannies, and personal assistants for wealthy families says it’s been overwhelmed with calls from recently laid off hospitality workers looking for new jobs. Restaurants across the country have been forced to convert to take-out only or close entirely and hotels stand empty as authorities ask Americans to practice social distancing to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.David Youdovin, the CEO of Hire Society, told Business Insider that his firm has placed over a dozen people in new roles this month alone. Some of the openings
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