A legendary Harvard Business School professor told us the Boeing mess is ‘a template for how not to be trustworthy.’ Here’s what you should do to build public trust instead.

Sandra Sucher is a professor of management practice at Harvard Business School. She is writing a book on how companies build trust.She told Business Insider that Boeing’s story was “a template for how not to be trustworthy.”Here’s what else she has to say about how Boeing and its leadership fall short on the four dimensions…

A legendary Harvard Business School professor told us the Boeing mess is ‘a template for how not to be trustworthy.’ Here’s what you should do to build public trust instead.

Sandra Sucher is a professor of management practice at Harvard Business School. She is writing a book on how companies build trust.She told Business Insider that Boeing’s story was “a template for how not to be trustworthy.”Here’s what else she has to say about how Boeing and its leadership fall short on the four dimensions of trust: competence, motives, methods, and impact.Click here for more BI Prime stories.Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg’s highly publicized decision not to take a bonus this year shows “just how little he understands about human nature,” said Sandra Sucher, who teaches management practice at Harvard Business School and has over 25 years of experience in industry and nonprofit management.Muilenburg giving up his bonus is “a completely weird gesture,” she said. The executive said he gave up “tens of millions” at Wednesday’s DealBook conference, a move following the two Boeing 737 Max crashes in October 2018 and March that left the company reeling — and the public demanding answers.Muilenburg appeared before Congress on October 29, later meeting privately with the families affected by the second crash. He said today that hearing the families’ stories affected him so deeply that he started thinking about how he could send an individual message of responsibility, in the form of forgoing the bonus until Max jets are once again in the air.The move creates a strange equivalence, Sucher said, between the money Muilenburg receives and the lives that were lost on his watch. “It’s a confusion of what’s the denominator here,” Sucher told Business Insider. “No one’s thinking about what he gets paid; they’re thinking about the fact that he presided over two crashes that killed 346 people.” A CEO voluntarily giving up his bonus has precedent. Amid the recession in 2009, Honeywell implemented furloughs — a situation in which employees are asked to take unpaid leaves but aren’t let go — in place of layoffs. Employees were understandably upset, and Honeywell’s top management showed their sympathy by losing out on more than half of the
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