A 31-year-old freelancer who quit the job she hated and now makes $200,000 on her own terms debunks 3 of the biggest myths she’s encountered about becoming your own boss

I’ve always dreamed of having a high-profile corporate career. I knew that if I just worked hard enough, one day I’d have my name on the door of my very own corner office in some beautiful big-city high rise. However, at just 31-years-old I found myself stuck in a job that I had grown to…

A 31-year-old freelancer who quit the job she hated and now makes $200,000 on her own terms debunks 3 of the biggest myths she’s encountered about becoming your own boss

I’ve always dreamed of having a high-profile corporate career. I knew that if I just worked hard enough, one day I’d have my name on the door of my very own corner office in some beautiful big-city high rise. However, at just 31-years-old I found myself stuck in a job that I had grown to hate. I felt underpaid, overworked, mistreated, disrespected, and creatively stifled. And so, one rainy April morning, I walked into my boss’s office, told her I was done, and sought out to achieve the success I so desired — on my own terms. Today, I am a full-time freelance graphic designer earning $200,000 a year, working out of my own corner-office in downtown Miami. Although perceptions of freelancing are becoming increasingly positive as more professionals adopt this lifestyle, I find that there are still a host of misconceptions about this career path. Here are a few of what I have found to be some of the most popular myths, debunked, and how freelance has helped me create the kind of career that I never would have been able to achieve with a traditional employer. Myth 1: “Freelancing is unstable, and there’s a lot of uncertainty.” My income is much more stable than that of a traditional “9-5” worker. People lose their jobs every day due to circumstances beyond their control — recessions, layoffs, or simply being on the wrong end of bad office politics. If you haven’t been through it personally, I am sure you know someone who has, and it’s heartbreaking. When you work a “regular” job your employer holds your fate in their hands. It’s like having all of your eggs in one basket. I, on the other hand, have multiple sources of income, and no one is in c
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