Here’s how WeWork is rolling out global layoffs over Zoom as the coworking giant struggles to cope with coronavirus fallout

This story is available exclusively on Business Insider Prime. Join BI Prime and start reading now. WeWork has started global layoffs as the coronavirus pandemic ravages the office industry, with sales, physical product, operations, and other groups seeing cuts on Thursday.Other venture-backed competitors, including Knotel, Industrious, and Convene, have laid off hundreds as the pandemic…

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WeWork has started global layoffs as the coronavirus pandemic ravages the office industry, with sales, physical product, operations, and other groups seeing cuts on Thursday.Other venture-backed competitors, including Knotel, Industrious, and Convene, have laid off hundreds as the pandemic drives down demand for office space.Earlier this month, WeWork’s outsourced cleaning provider, JLL, laid off some cleaning staff in response to the pandemic. For more WeWork stories, click here. 

WeWork laid staff off on Thursday in cuts that could continue for the next month. Affected departments ranged from business operations to sales to physical product, which includes design. The layoffs came via Zoom calls, as has become the norm across downsizing companies under shelter-in-place orders.People who were laid off, who spoke under the condition of anonymity because of nondisclosure agreements, described departmental executives delivering the cuts via a script to their respective groups – chief sales officer Nick Worswick talked to the sales team, and chief product officer Hamid Hashemi spoke to physical product, for example. The executives then handed the call to human resources. The latest cuts come on top of thousands of jobs the coworking company has slashed after its IPO imploded last year. The laid-off employees received the same severance as those affected by the November cuts: four months of salary and benefits. 

The total number of cuts was not communicated to employees, said multiple sources.In November, employees were laid off en masse, with New York employees reporting to WeWork’s Chelsea headquarters with their company-issued electronics to turn in over the course of a day.Now, the layoffs appear to be rolled out over days and weeks. At an all-staff meeting earlier this month, CEO Sandeep Mathrani said the cuts would finish by the end of May, Bloomberg reported. “
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Lyft ends electric scooter operations in Oakland, Austin and San Jose

Lyft, which just had a massive round of layoffs wherein 982 people lost their jobs and 288 were furloughed, is also pumping the brakes on its scooter operations in a handful of cities. “We’re focusing our resources where we can have the biggest impact and best serve cities and riders,” a Lyft spokesperson said in…

Lyft, which just had a massive round of layoffs wherein 982 people lost their jobs and 288 were furloughed, is also pumping the brakes on its scooter operations in a handful of cities.
“We’re focusing our resources where we can have the biggest impact and best serve cities and riders,” a Lyft spokesperson said in a statement to TechCrunch. “We’re continuing to invest in our bike and scooter business, but have made the tough decision to shift resources away from three scooter markets and toward opportunities where we are set up for longer-term success.”
In an email sent to Oakland riders yesterday, Lyft said scooters would no longer be available,
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New York Post Publisher Tells Staff That Business Is ‘Drastically Disrupted’ by Coronavirus, Announces Layoffs

Michael NagleThe publisher of one of New York’s last remaining daily tabloids said its business had been “drastically disrupted” by the economic impact of the coronavirus crisis.During a series of calls with staffers on Wednesday, New York Post publisher Sean Giancola, announced that the company will take significant cost-cutting measures to keep the publication afloat…

Michael NagleThe publisher of one of New York’s last remaining daily tabloids said its business had been “drastically disrupted” by the economic impact of the coronavirus crisis.During a series of calls with staffers on Wednesday, New York Post publisher Sean Giancola, announced that the company will take significant cost-cutting measures to keep the publication afloat following the “significant decrease in the advertising demand,” as business closures have shrunk budgets. People familiar with the matter told The Daily Beast that more than a dozen staffers were laid off. “The paper is dying,” said one staffer who was axed.Over the past several weeks, the Rupert Murdoch-owned Post has told its part-time staff of “runners”—the street reporters who feed copy back to the newsroom—that they would be receiving months-long furloughs without pay until the crisis was over. The team that works on the paper’s luxury supplement Alexa were also furloughed last Friday alongside a number of staffers from the sports department. But in Wednesday’s meeting, G
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Layoffs hit ride-sharing industry as Lyft and Uber struggle to survive pandemic

Lyft is cutting employees amid the coronavirus pandemic. Image: DON EMMERT / AFP via Getty Images By Sasha Lekach2020-04-29 21:34:32 UTC With most people sheltering at home during this pandemic, ride-hailing apps aren’t getting much use these days. This initially translated into quickly declining revenue for companies like Uber and Lyft, but now, more than…

Lyft is cutting employees amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Image: DON EMMERT / AFP via Getty Images

By Sasha Lekach2020-04-29 21:34:32 UTC

With most people sheltering at home during this pandemic, ride-hailing apps aren’t getting much use these days. This initially translated into quickly declining revenue for companies like Uber and Lyft, but now, more than a month into the coronavirus pandemic, both are announcing layoffs. 
Uber and Lyft are very much feeling the effects of social distancing measures to combat the coronavirus outbreak. On Wednesday, San Francisco-based Lyft put out a filing through the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission about a 17-percent workforce cut. That amounts to about 982 workers, a figure which doesn’t involve any independently contracted drivers. In another cost-savings effort, roughly 288 additional employees were furloughed and all remaining salaried employees
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Like Uber, Lyft Can’t Get Rid of Its Employees Fast Enough

Photo: GettyYounger, smaller, and less recognizable, Lyft has always lived in the substantial shadow of its main competitor Uber. Now it’s dying in it too.Social distancing has put the transportation sector against impossible odds: subway ridership in my home city of New York is down at least 74-percent; total flights may drop off up to…

Photo: GettyYounger, smaller, and less recognizable, Lyft has always lived in the substantial shadow of its main competitor Uber. Now it’s dying in it too.Social distancing has put the transportation sector against impossible odds: subway ridership in my home city of New York is down at least 74-percent; total flights may drop off up to 90-percent this summer. Being in a small, enclosed space with a stranger who likely does not have health insurance couldn’t be less appealing at this juncture in history—and consequently ridesharing has fallen off a cliff too. Reported by CNBC, Lyft is laying off 982 of its current employees, and furloughing an additional 288—taken together, that trims the current workforce there by a considerable 22-percent. It’s not clear which departments were the focus of these cuts, though we’ve asked Lyft to supply that
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Lyft lays off almost 1,000 staffers as Uber weighs big layoffs

Coronavirus — Report says Uber’s ride bookings have fallen 80 percent from a year earlier. Timothy B. Lee – Apr 29, 2020 8:29 pm UTC Lyft is laying of 982 people, the company said in a regulatory filing on Wednesday. That represents 17 percent of the company’s official workforce (the company considers its thousands of…

Coronavirus —

Report says Uber’s ride bookings have fallen 80 percent from a year earlier.

Timothy B. Lee
– Apr 29, 2020 8:29 pm UTC

Lyft is laying of 982 people, the company said in a regulatory filing on Wednesday. That represents 17 percent of the company’s official workforce (the company considers its thousands of drivers to be independent contractors).
An additional 288 employees will be furloughed, Lyft said. Most of the remaining salaried employees will take 10 percent pay cuts, while executives will face pay cuts of 20 to 30 percent.
The cuts reflect the dire
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Juul is reportedly laying off 800 to 950 employees

Juul is set to eliminate between 800 to 950 jobs, according to a new report from The Wall Street Journal. Those massive cuts would amount to around a third of the Bay Area vaping giant’s entire workforce. While the news comes amid a deluge of layoff reports, Juul’s troubles are said not to be a…

Juul is set to eliminate between 800 to 950 jobs, according to a new report from The Wall Street Journal. Those massive cuts would amount to around a third of the Bay Area vaping giant’s entire workforce.
While the news comes amid a deluge of layoff reports, Juul’s troubles are said not to be a direct result from the COVID-19 pandemic. Rather, they stem from larger ongoing problems. After all, it wouldn’t be the first time the company has made a sizable cut to its staff — in October, it laid off around 650 people.
Juul wouldn’t confirm the specifics of the news, but does appear to acknowledge some big changes are afoot, as the company look
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Lyft tightens its belt, laying off 17% of its workforce – CNET

This is Lyft’s second round of layoffs this year. Angela Lang/CNET Lyft is significantly cutting back its staff. The ride-hailing company revealed in a regulatory filing Wednesday that it’s terminating about 982 employees, which is 17% of its workforce. Lyft said the layoffs are part of its efforts to reduce operating expenses and adjust cash flows…

This is Lyft’s second round of layoffs this year.
Angela Lang/CNET
Lyft is significantly cutting back its staff. The ride-hailing company revealed in a regulatory filing Wednesday that it’s terminating about 982 employees, which is 17% of its workforce. Lyft said the layoffs are part of its efforts to reduce operating expenses and adjust cash flows because of “ongoing economic challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the company’s business.”The belt tightening comes as Lyft has seen its business curtailed by the novel coronavirus outbreak. It’s seen its ride-hailing revenue dry up, along with that from its bike and scooter rentals. In an effort to diversify its offerings, Lyft has rolled out a series of new programs, such as a pilot for delivering medical supplies and test kits to senior citizens and other vulnerable populations. It’s also working on a meal delivery program and has partnered with Amazon to provide the retail giant with delivery drivers.”It is now clear that the COVID-19 crisis is going to have broad-reaching implications for the economy, which
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Lyft is laying off 982 employees, furloughing a further 288 due to COVID-19 pandemic

Less than 24 hours after it was reported that Uber was considering layoffs of 20% of staff, its big rival Lyft is announcing its own cuts. Today the company said it would be reducing employee count by 17%, working out to 982 employees, and furloughing an additional 288, due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic…

Less than 24 hours after it was reported that Uber was considering layoffs of 20% of staff, its big rival Lyft is announcing its own cuts.
Today the company said it would be reducing employee count by 17%, working out to 982 employees, and furloughing an additional 288, due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on Lyft’s business.
It also will put in place salary reductions of 30% for executive leadership, 20% for vice presidents and 10% for all other employees, while members of Lyft’s board of directors will forego 30% of their cash compensation for the second quarter of 2020.
Lyft said that it will take a restructuring charge of between $28 million and $36 million as a result, which will come through in its Q2 financials.
The news comes in the wake of technology sector layoffs now crossing 32,221 people since March 11. Transportation has been hit in a particularly tough way, in part because people are not moving around as much due to stay-at-home orders; and in part because of the worries of infecti
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As Uber reportedly contemplates layoffs, a look back at its post-IPO financial performance

Hello and welcome back to our regular morning look at private companies, public markets and the gray space in between. Yesterday news broke that Uber’s CTO Thuan Pham would leave the company (confirmed), and that the American technology giant is contemplating a huge staffing cut to reduce its cost structure. COVID-19 has changed how much…

Hello and welcome back to our regular morning look at private companies, public markets and the gray space in between.
Yesterday news broke that Uber’s CTO Thuan Pham would leave the company (confirmed), and that the American technology giant is contemplating a huge staffing cut to reduce its cost structure. COVID-19 has changed how much people move around, hampering the ride-hailing company’s business.
If the cuts come to pass at the scale T
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