Bernie Sanders plan to reshape employment includes an under-the-radar idea that would be a huge win for American workers

Sen. Bernie Sanders has made ending at-will employment a part of his 2020 presidential platform.Eliminating at-will employment is one way to give hardworking employees more protection and power.Ending at-will employment would also not be devastating to employment if it was implemented nationwide. Bryce Covert is an independent journalist writing about the economy.This is an opinion column.…

Sen. Bernie Sanders has made ending at-will employment a part of his 2020 presidential platform.Eliminating at-will employment is one way to give hardworking employees more protection and power.Ending at-will employment would also not be devastating to employment if it was implemented nationwide. Bryce Covert is an independent journalist writing about the economy.This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.In most parts of the country, if you aren’t lucky enough to be part of a union that negotiated protections or in such demand that you can secure them in your own contract, you can be fired from your job at pretty much anytime and for virtually any reason, other than outright discrimination or for exercising your labor rights. This is what’s known as “at will” employment.

It would be more accurately called “at your employer’s will.” Your boss doesn’t have to have a good excuse. If your boss doesn’t like what you post online or how you wear your hair, for example, he or she can tell you to pack up your things and leave.At-will employment gives a significant upper hand to the country’s employers. But Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders wants to change that dynamic.As part of a plan focused on workers’ and labor rights, , Sanders called for a national law mandating that employers can only fire employees for “just cause”—or in other words, only for good reason.American employers hold a lot of power over today’s workers. While Sanders’s idea wouldn’t completely balance the scales, it would give the workers’ side a little more weight: the reassurance that if they perform their jobs adequately, they can’t just be fired arbitrarily.

Trying to rebalance the scales of powerBehemoth corporations hold a lot of sway in today’s economy. Virtually every industry has been concentrating since the late 1990s, which has given companies monopsony power and left workers with fewer employment options..As the pool of companies dwindles, workers have little choice but to settle for the terms and conditions offered by  the biggest employers. So those employers can keep pay and benefits low.In the most concentrated sectors, wages have been suppressed. Concentration has also meant that there are between 5% to 18% fewer jobs than there otherwise would be
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Paradigm’s Sam Gores Denies Agency In Talks To Be Acquired By CAA, As Agency Shutters Unscripted TV

Courtesy of Paradigm Another day, another round of rumors about Paradigm. There had been steady chatter for the past couple of months about merger conversations between CAA and Paradigm, with both sides privately shutting down speculation. Paradigm chief Sam Gores did it internally today following an LA Times report that he held exploratory talks to…

Courtesy of Paradigm

Another day, another round of rumors about Paradigm. There had been steady chatter for the past couple of months about merger conversations between CAA and Paradigm, with both sides privately shutting down speculation. Paradigm chief Sam Gores did it internally today following an LA Times report that he held exploratory talks to be acquired by CAA. Gores flatly denied the agency was considering the CAA deal, issuing an internal memo to the agency’s troops. As you might recall, Paradigm went down the road toward a deal with UTA, but Gores had a change of heart and wanted to remain independent.

There have been recent internal changes at Paradigm. The agency has shuttered its unscripted television department, for the reason that it wasn’t performing up to the satisfaction of ownership. That was part of the 30 layoffs Deadline revealed earlier this month.  Two Paradigm unscripted agents, Julie Choi and senior agent Sean Zeid were
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Lyft lays off 90 people as it aims to achieve profitability

From our ObsessionFuture of MobilityHumanity needs new ways to sustainably move around.Lyft confirmed on Thursday that it will cut 90 people from its enterprise sales and marketing teams, or around 1.6% of its 5,500-person workforce, as it aims to achieve profitable growth.“We’ve carefully evaluated the resources we need to achieve our 2020 business goals, and…

From our ObsessionFuture of MobilityHumanity needs new ways to sustainably move around.Lyft confirmed on Thursday that it will cut 90 people from its enterprise sales and marketing teams, or around 1.6% of its 5,500-person workforce, as it aims to achieve profitable growth.“We’ve carefully evaluated the resources we need to achieve our 2020 business goals, and the restructuring of some of our teams reflects that,” says Lyft’s spokesperson Alexandra LaManna. “We are still growing rapidly and plan to hire more than 1,000 new employees this year.” According to the company, it will be focusing on organizing its marketing teams by “larger unified regions”—east and west, for example—rather than a more distributed, localized model. The layoffs were first reported by the New York Times on Wednesday as being part of corporate restructuring. Lyft disputed the report that it was significantly modifying its fin
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Don’t Wait Until After The Election to Make Financial Decisions

Photo: Getty ImagesThirty-two percent of people are holding off on making “major financial decisions” until after the presidential election, according to a new survey from FinanceBuzz. In addition, 72% of respondents said they believe whoever gets elected will have “a direct impact on their personal finances.”It’s easy to understand why people might wait to see…

Photo: Getty ImagesThirty-two percent of people are holding off on making “major financial decisions” until after the presidential election, according to a new survey from FinanceBuzz. In addition, 72% of respondents said they believe whoever gets elected will have “a direct impact on their personal finances.”It’s easy to understand why people might wait to see what happens in the wake of the next election. Several candidates have plans to either reduce college costs or wipe out student debt completely. Some candidates are cool with some version of our current healthcare system, while others want government-run Medicare for all.And as the election draws nearer, the remaining candidates are getting bolder about their personal platforms. Just this month, Elizabeth Warren outlined all the ways she would reduce student loan debt without needing legislation to be passed
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BIG TECH IN HEALTHCARE: Here’s who wins and loses as Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft home in on niche sectors of healthcare

This is a preview of The Big Tech in Healthcare research report from Business Insider Intelligence.Purchase this report.Business Insider Intelligence offers even more technology coverage with Connectivity & Tech Pro. Subscribe today to receive industry-changing connectivity news and analysis to your inbox.The Big Four tech companies — Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft — are accelerating…

This is a preview of The Big Tech in Healthcare research report from Business Insider Intelligence.Purchase this report.Business Insider Intelligence offers even more technology coverage with Connectivity & Tech Pro. Subscribe today to receive industry-changing connectivity news and analysis to your inbox.The Big Four tech companies — Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft — are accelerating their pursuit of the healthcare market, and they’re starting to home their strategies in on specific corners of the ecosystem.

Business Insider Intelligence

US healthcare players are being forced to move on their digital transformation efforts, and Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft are lending their data prowess and tech-savviness to become attractive partners for the job.Healthcare organizations have to contend with a population that’s growing sicker, heightened costs, and shifting consumer demands for fast and convenient services. Further, the electronic health record (EHR) boom over the last decade has ushered in the need for organizations to revamp infrastructure and IT strategies.The Big Four have stepped in to alleviate these issues, bridging technological gaps that give health organization partners the opportunity to realize cost savings and bolster their top lines.These players are ramping up their efforts to reshape healthcare by developing and collaborating on new tools that could be a boon to consumers, medical professionals, and insurers.And they’re zeroing in on specific areas within healthcare: For instance, Microsoft dropped its consumer-facing wearables and health record system to narrow its focus on its cloud offerings for health systems, Apple is knuckling down on clinical research initiatives via its wearables, Alphabet is focusing on its AI expertise to drive precision medicine, and Amazon is reaching across the board — from pharmacy to medical supply delivery to telehealth. And while their health plays have presented myriad opportunities for healthcare stakeholders, some of the tech giants’ initiatives are encroaching on legacy players’ businesses and upsetting incumbents.In this report, Business Insider Intelligence explores the key strengths and offerings the Big Four tech giants bring to healthcare — and how
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Economic Report: New U.S. jobless claim fall slightly to 216,000 in late January

Veterans attend jobs fair in Los Angeles. The U.S. unemployment rate sits at a 50-year low of 3.5% after years of steady hiring. The numbers: The number of Americans who applied for unemployment benefits in late January fell slightly and gave no hint of rising layoffs, indicating the labor market remains very robust. Initial jobless…

Veterans attend jobs fair in Los Angeles. The U.S. unemployment rate sits at a 50-year low of 3.5% after years of steady hiring. The numbers: The number of Americans who applied for unemployment benefits in late January fell slightly and gave no hint of rising layoffs, indicating the labor market remains very robust. Initial jobless claims declined by 7,000 to 216,000 in the seven days ended Jan. 25, the government said Thursday. The figures are seasonally adjusted.

Unusually, new claims in the prior week were revised up by a large 12,000 to 223,000. Big revision like that are rare but can happen sometimes around the holiday season. The more stable monthly average of jobless claims that filters out the weekly ups and downs fell by 1,750 to 214,500. New unemployment claims are seen as a rough measure of how many people are losing their jobs. They briefly fell under 200,000 last April to a 50-year low and have hovered in the low 200,000s sinc
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The layoff horror stories from OYO

It didn’t take much persuading for 32-year-old Aman (name changed on request) to join OYO, the star among Indian startups, when an offer came last October to help expand the hotel aggregator’s newest venture: OYO Kitchen. “They told me OYO Kitchen was their ‘baby’ and they wanted it to flourish,” said the marketing graduate, who…

It didn’t take much persuading for 32-year-old Aman (name changed on request) to join OYO, the star among Indian startups, when an offer came last October to help expand the hotel aggregator’s newest venture: OYO Kitchen. “They told me OYO Kitchen was their ‘baby’ and they wanted it to flourish,” said the marketing graduate, who left another su
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Oyo, the ‘jewel’ in SoftBank’s startup portfolio, just announced more layoffs in the U.S. weeks after cutting thousands of jobs in India and China

Oyo, the Indian budget hotel startup backed by SoftBank, is laying off sales employees in the U.S., two sources directly familiar with the cuts told Business Insider. Layoffs will impact mainly sales personnel and sales support staff at Oyo’s US headquarters in Dallas and other sales hubs.The layoffs come just weeks after the startup cut 1,800…

Oyo, the Indian budget hotel startup backed by SoftBank, is laying off sales employees in the U.S., two sources directly familiar with the cuts told Business Insider. Layoffs will impact mainly sales personnel and sales support staff at Oyo’s US headquarters in Dallas and other sales hubs.The layoffs come just weeks after the startup cut 1,800 jobs across its larger offices in India and China.The buzzy startup was widely considered one of the “crown jewels” in SoftBank’s portfolio after the implosion at coworking startup WeWork. It had raised more than $3 billion in funding and was valued at $10 billion.This is the latest of job cuts hitting SoftBank-backed startups as the investor pushes its companies to prioritize profitability over growth.Click here for more BI Prime stories.Oyo, the Indian budget hotel startup backed by SoftBank, is laying off a significant number of its sales and support staff in the US, two sources directly familiar with the cuts told Business Insider. 

The job cuts come three weeks after the Gurugram, India-based startup said it was eliminating 1,800 jobs at its much larger offices in China and India. Company leaders had described the layoffs as part of a reorganization, consolidating jobs in an effort to juice the company’s revenue.It was not immediately clear how many jobs were cut and which offices were affected. Spokespeople for SoftBank and Oyo did not return Business Insider’s request for comment. Oyo’s layoffs come as other SoftBank-backed companies also restructure with a new focus on profitability. A Business Insider review of SoftBank’s portfolio found 2,600 job cuts across Oyo, Rappi, Getaround, and Zume in the first week of January, and more than 7,000 layoffs in the last year across 14 companies. The total number of cuts doesn’t include groups of employees like WeWork’s 1,000 janitorial staff who are being outsourced in the US and Canada.In a memo sent to Oyo staff on Wednesday that was seen by Business Insider, chief operating officer Abhinav Sinha cited sustainable growth as the reason for sweepin
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Lyft confirms 90 layoffs as it targets profitability

Shares of popular American ride-hailing giant Lyft are off 1.5% today in regular trading after The New York Times reported that the company would cut some staff. TechCrunch confirmed with the company that 90 individuals are expected to be impacted by the changes. The company’s shares dipped as far as 3% before recovering. In a…

Shares of popular American ride-hailing giant Lyft are off 1.5% today in regular trading after The New York Times reported that the company would cut some staff. TechCrunch confirmed with the company that 90 individuals are expected to be impacted by the changes. The company’s shares dipped as far as 3% before recovering.
In a statement, the company said that it has “carefully evaluated the resources we need to achieve our 2020 business goals, and the restructuring of some of our teams reflects that. We are still growing rapidly and plan to hire more than 1,000 new employees this year.”
Lyft has been under pressure along with industry peer Uber to show a path to profitability after a history of cash burn and unprofitability.
During its most recent earnings report, Q3 2019, Lyft said that it expects “to be profitable on an adjusted EBITDA basis in the fourth quarter of 2021,” earlier than previously expected. Th
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