For Dancers, the Not-So-Lazy Days of Summer

Five performers tell us about their off-season. It’s not all work and no play, but they didn’t forget to stay in shape.ImageSarah Hayes Harkins, a dancer at Charlotte Ballet, teaches ballet in the summer — and drives for Lyft.CreditCreditKennedi Carter for The New York TimesPublished Aug. 29, 2019Updated Aug. 30, 2019, 1:04 p.m. ETA body…

Five performers tell us about their off-season. It’s not all work and no play, but they didn’t forget to stay in shape.ImageSarah Hayes Harkins, a dancer at Charlotte Ballet, teaches ballet in the summer — and drives for Lyft.CreditCreditKennedi Carter for The New York TimesPublished Aug. 29, 2019Updated Aug. 30, 2019, 1:04 p.m. ETA body in motion tends to stay in motion, so summer can present a challenge for dancers. For those who work at ballet companies, the period after July 4 usually means a layoff of at least a few weeks. But free time doesn’t necessarily mean sloth. (Though, like all of us, dancers crave rest.) Summer is festival season. With events like the Vail Dance Festival or the Fire Island Dance Festival, the summer months can offer opportunities to try on new roles or different styles, to choreograph or maybe to collaborate with dancers from other companies.It can also be a time of anxiety, particularly for dancers at smaller companies or freelancers. With downtime comes a loss of income, which must be supplemented in other ways. For a lucky few, summer is time — at least in part — for some much-needed rest from the demands of an art that takes its toll on the body. I spoke with dancers from different disciplines: ballet, modern, tap and Indian classical dance, about what they do in the summer months. Their accounts have been edited and condensed.Sarah Hayes Harkins: A Ballerina Behind the WheelSarah Hayes Harkins, 29, has been a dancer with Charlotte Ballet in North Carolina since 2008. Though the company has no official ranks, Ms. Harkins has performed most of the principal parts: Cinderella, Aurora in “Sleeping Beauty” and Sugarplum in “The Nutcracker.” The company has 20 dancers, for whom it guarantees at least 36 weeks of work. (This arrangement is not unusual, and 36 weeks is considered good in the field.) That leaves up to 16 unpaid weeks a year. During the summer layoff, my husband — a classical guitarist — and I definitely have to hunker down and be really conscious of the money going out and coming in. My main source of other work here in Charlotte is teaching private ballet lessons. I also drive for Lyft. I have a Volkswagen Tiguan, a little silver baby S.U.V. I make a solid average of $10 an hour. I’ll do it for most of the day and not take a break. If I stretch for a while after I’m done, I’m fine. It doesn’t make my body feel any worse than it already does.To be honest, the time goes by very quickly. I’m a super social person so if they want to talk I’m totally down for that. For me it’s the perfect little side job. Last year I drove Aziz Ansari. I picked him up from Bojangles’ Coliseum where he had been doing a show. Aziz and his dad came out the back door and hopped in. He was really nice. He was watching videos of the show he had just done on his phone. At one point, his dad was trying to give me directions, and Aziz stopped him and said, dad, she’s got the thing, you don’t have to tell her how to get there!Shantala Shivalingappa: Back to NatureImageMs. Shivalingappa in Mysore, India, this summer.The Chennai-born dancer Shantala Shivalingappa lives in Paris and spends much of the year on the road. Her training is in the Indian classical dance form kuchipudi, but just as often, she works with contemporary choreographers and theater directors. Each summer, Ms. Shivalingappa, 43, leaves her performing life behind and returns to India.I spend almost two and a half months in India, without anyth
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Searsageddon: Massive Headquarters Layoffs, More Store Closings Reported

More layoffs, more store closings. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)2017 George FreyAfter all Sears has been through, you’d think it couldn’t get any worse. But now reports from inside the company and from at least one of its vendors say the deconstruction of the once fabled retailer has entered a new – and particularly devastating…

More layoffs, more store closings. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)2017 George FreyAfter all Sears has been through, you’d think it couldn’t get any worse. But now reports from inside the company and from at least one of its vendors say the deconstruction of the once fabled retailer has entered a new – and particularly devastating – stage.A key vendor, who wished not to be identified because the company still does business with Sears – reported that buyers at the company said 80% of the workforce at Sears Hoffman Estates, IL corporate offices had been laid off last night. It was not possible to establish a number of employees fired but previous reports from vendors who visited the offices said there were vast empty spaces in the offices and hundreds of workers were already long since gone.What was particul
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Economic Report: China trade war drags consumer sentiment down to the lowest level in four years

Summertime blues? By one measure, Americans are the least confident in the economy in four years. The numbers: A measure of how Americans view the strength of the economy fell to the lowest level in almost three years, reflecting growing worries about the U.S. trade war with China that’s led to higher and higher tariffs.…

Summertime blues? By one measure, Americans are the least confident in the economy in four years. The numbers: A measure of how Americans view the strength of the economy fell to the lowest level in almost three years, reflecting growing worries about the U.S. trade war with China that’s led to higher and higher tariffs. The final consumer sentiment survey fell to 89.8 in August from an early estimate of 92.3 and a 98.4 reading in July, the University of Michigan said Friday.

It’s the lowest mark since October 2016. Just a year and a half ago, the index hit 101.4 to mark the highest level since 2004. What happened: The sharp decline in consumer sentiment stemmed from increasingly negative views of the one-third of respondents that brought up the tariffs on their own. They worry the dispute will increase inflation, reduce incomes and raise unemployment. Many Americans still don’t appear to be fazed by the trade fight, however. Another closely followed measure of attitudes known as consumer confidence remained near an 19-high in August. Part of the divergence reflects differences in the surv
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Disney Layoffs Hit Nearly 60 in Media Distribution Division

August 29, 2019 2:40PM PT In the further wake of its acquisition of 21st Century Fox’s entertainment portfolio, Disney has laid off nearly 60 employees, Variety has learned, within its Media Distribution division, impacting those within both Disney and Fox. Counted among those layoffs are 20th Century Fox TV Distribution’s worldwide marketing executive vice president…

August 29, 2019 2:40PM PT

In the further wake of its acquisition of 21st Century Fox’s entertainment portfolio, Disney has laid off nearly 60 employees, Variety has learned, within its Media Distribution division, impacting those within both Disney and Fox.
Counted among those layoffs are 20th Century Fox TV Distribution’s worldwide marketing executive vice president Greg Drebin and 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment’s worldwide marketing and strategy senior vice president Jennifer Chai, according to a source familiar with the situation.
Drebin had been promoted to his most recent position at 20th, up from senior vice president, early in 2018.

In March, 20th Century Fox TV Distribution president Mark Kaner was let go amid an initial wave of layoffs, just days after the close of Disney’s $71.3 billion acquisition of Fox’s entertainment and studio assets, which included 20th Century Fox’s film and TV studios, Fox Searchlight Pictures, Fox 2000 Pictures, Fox Family, Fox Animation, FX Productions, FX Networks, National Geographic and Fox’s stake in Hulu. It was estimated then that the layoffs could number as high as 4,000 positions at the combined companies.

Earlier in August, layoffs hit Disney’s studio as well as 20th Century Fox, impacting several dozen employees, including several key executives, in the production and visual effects departments.

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Disney Layoffs Hit TV Distribution, Home Entertainment Units Post Fox Merger; 20th TV EVP Greg Drebin Exits

Five months after Disney’s $71.3 billion acquisition of key Fox assets was completed, there has been a new round of layoffs in Disney’s media distribution areas that include home entertainment and TV distribution, I have learned. I hear several dozen employees, just under 60, were affected, both on Fox and Disney side. I hear among…

Five months after Disney’s $71.3 billion acquisition of key Fox assets was completed, there has been a new round of layoffs in Disney’s media distribution areas that include home entertainment and TV distribution, I have learned. I hear several dozen employees, just under 60, were affected, both on Fox and Disney side. I hear among the highest-ranked among those who are leaving are Greg Drebin, EVP of Worldwide Marketing for 20th Century Fox TV Distribution; and Jennifer Chai, SVP, Worldwide Marketing & Strategy for 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment.

The news of more post-merger layoffs at Disney is not surprising in light of the company’s recent disappointing fiscal third-quarter earnings report. In it, Disney blamed the earnings miss on the integration of Fox’s entertainment assets as well as streaming investments and weak theme parks attendance.

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Disney+ Subscription Interest Outpacing Initial Company Targets, Report Finds

Between pressure to trim costs related to the merger by stepping up savings/synergies and shifting distribution patterns away from traditional channels, like home enter
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No production days at firms, layoffs: Maharashtra Labour unions plan protests in September

At the labour unions’ meeting in Nashik. (Express Photo)IN AN indication of the spreading worry about the industrial slowdown, major labour unions affiliated to CPI(M), Shiv Sena and MNS, as well independent unions, gathered in Nashik last Saturday, resolving to hold protests in every district of Maharashtra to demand protection from retrenchment and layoffs as…

At the labour unions’ meeting in Nashik. (Express Photo)IN AN indication of the spreading worry about the industrial slowdown, major labour unions affiliated to CPI(M), Shiv Sena and MNS, as well independent unions, gathered in Nashik last Saturday, resolving to hold protests in every district of Maharashtra to demand protection from retrenchment and layoffs as well as scrapping of the proposed labour laws.
The unions plan to hold the protests in the districts between September 15 to 20. They would also hold a state-level protest, demanding the government’s intervention in providing minimum wages to the labourers who have lost their jobs.
National vice-president of CPI(M)-affiliated Centre of Indian Trade Unions (CITU), D L Karad, told The Indian Express that “more than 10,000 workers”, mostly on contracts, have lost their jobs in Nashik district in the last three months. Many companies are also observing “stoppage of work” or “no production days” between one to 10 days every month since June.
According to the records of the labour department, 2,042 factories employ 1.15 lakh people in Nashik district.
Representatives of CITU, All India Trade Union Congress (AITUC), Sena-affiliated Bharatiya Kamgar Sena, independent Rashtriya Shramik Ekta Mahasangh, the MNS labour wing and Bosch Employees Union attended the meeting.
Karad, while addressing a gathering of 200 representatives of unions from Mumbai, Pune, Nashik and Aurangabad, maintained that thousands of contractual workers have been asked
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No production days at firms, layoffs: Maharashtra Labour unions plan protests in September

At the labour unions’ meeting in Nashik. (Express Photo)IN AN indication of the spreading worry about the industrial slowdown, major labour unions affiliated to CPI(M), Shiv Sena and MNS, as well independent unions, gathered in Nashik last Saturday, resolving to hold protests in every district of Maharashtra to demand protection from retrenchment and layoffs as…

At the labour unions’ meeting in Nashik. (Express Photo)IN AN indication of the spreading worry about the industrial slowdown, major labour unions affiliated to CPI(M), Shiv Sena and MNS, as well independent unions, gathered in Nashik last Saturday, resolving to hold protests in every district of Maharashtra to demand protection from retrenchment and layoffs as well as scrapping of the proposed labour laws.
The unions plan to hold the protests in the districts between September 15 to 20. They would also hold a state-level protest, demanding the government’s intervention in providing minimum wages to the labourers who have lost their jobs.
National vice-president of CPI(M)-affiliated Centre of Indian Trade Unions (CITU), D L Karad, told The Indian Express that “more than 10,000 workers”, mostly on contracts, have lost their jobs in Nashik district in the last three months. Many companies are also observing “stoppage of work” or “no production days” between one to 10 days every month since June.
According to the records of the labour department, 2,042 factories employ 1.15 lakh people in Nashik district.
Representatives of CITU, All India Trade Union Congress (AITUC), Sena-affiliated Bharatiya Kamgar Sena, independent Rashtriya Shramik Ekta Mahasangh, the MNS labour wing and Bosch Employees Union attended the meeting.
Karad, while addressing a gathering of 200 representatives of unions from Mumbai, Pune, Nashik and Aurangabad, maintained that thousands of contractual workers have been asked
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GameStop Just Relaunched Its Website–Here’s What’s New

Want us to remember this setting for all your devices? Sign up or Sign in now! Please use a html5 video capable browser to watch videos. This video has an invalid file format. Sorry, but you can’t access this content! Now Playing: Biggest Games Confirmed For 2019 | Get Hyped With This Montage GameSpot may…

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GameStop has officially re-launched its website. The retailer’s new site promises to provide a “modern digital shopping experience” that aims to be “engaging, easier, and faster to use.”In a press release, GameStop acknowledged that its legacy website became “increasingly difficult” to use and this was feedback it heard from users. You can check out the new website now and see all the changes for yourself.GameStop’s chief merchandising officer, Chris Homeister (who joined the company back in June), said in a statement that the re-launch of the new GameStop website is just the beginning. The company aims to “continue to build and improve” it over time.The aim of the new GameStop website is not only to refresh its look but also to improve its functionality. The search function has been improved, helping shoppers find products and complete purchases fa
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Uber, Lyft Propose $21/Hour Minimum Wage For Drivers After Wave Of Protests

Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading! Uber, Lyft Propose $21/Hour Minimum Wage For Drivers After Wave Of Protests (cbslocal.com) Posted by msmash on Thursday August 29, 2019 @02:10PM from the meeting-in-the-half-wa

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Uber, Lyft Propose $21/Hour Minimum Wage For Drivers After Wave Of Protests (cbslocal.com)

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from the meeting-in-the-half-wa
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The leading industry group for truck drivers has declared we’re hurtling toward a trucking ‘bloodbath’

Truckers typically bristle at the American Trucking Associations, an industry group that represents trucking companies rather than America’s 1.8 million truck drivers themselves. They’ve differed on just about every topic in the trucking world — whether teenagers should become truck drivers, if there’s really a trucker shortage, and how truckers should be compensated for rest…

Truckers typically bristle at the American Trucking Associations, an industry group that represents trucking companies rather than America’s 1.8 million truck drivers themselves. They’ve differed on just about every topic in the trucking world — whether teenagers should become truck drivers, if there’s really a trucker shortage, and how truckers should be compensated for rest breaks, if at all. But it seems the ATA and truck drivers have reached some sort of agreement on the state of their industry in 2019: It’s suffering. “There is no way these folks are making money now,” the ATA’s chief economist, Bob Costello, said at an industry conference on Monday, as reported by the Commercial Carrier Journal. “We do not have to go into a recession for this to be a bloodbath.” Costello said that because of the decline in rates in the spot market, the next 18 months specifically would be challenging for truckers. The ATA did not respond to Business Insider’s request for further comment. This year alone, nearly 3,000 truck drivers have lost their jobs as trucking companies large and small have shuttered. Major carriers like J.B. Hunt, Knight-Swift, and Schneider have been forced to cut their annual outlooks. The rate sentiment among industry leaders dipped to recession-level lows in July, a Morgan Stanley survey found. Read more: Truckers can’t pay off their fuel cards — and it’s a ‘sure sign’ that more trucking bankruptcies are coming Some positive indicators h
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